District Council of Booborowie

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The District Council of Booborowie was a local government area in South Australia from 1875 to 1935.[1]

It was proclaimed on 6 May 1875, following strong support at a public meeting the previous year. It initially comprised the cadastral Hundred of Ayers (modern Booborowie, North Booborowie and parts of Burra and Leighton).[2][3] It would later also gain the Hundred of Anne (modern Canowie, Willalo and parts of Hallett) to the north of the existing council, under the District Councils Act 1887.[4] The council initially met in the Booborowie eating house and Cobb and Co coach stopover prior to the construction of the Booborowie Council Chambers, on Main Road, Booborowie, in 1888-1889.[1][5][6] The former council chambers survive today and are listed on the South Australian Heritage Register.[7]

The council was abolished in 1935 following sweeping Local Government Commission recommendations that proposed cutting the number of municipalities in South Australia from 196 to 142. The initial report recommended annexing a section of both the Ayers and Anne wards to the District Council of Hallett as its Willalo Ward, annexing the remainder of Anne Ward to the District Council of Terowie, and amalgamating the remaining portions of the Booborowie council with the District Council of Burra, the District Council of Hanson and the District Council of Mount Bryan to form the District Council of Burra Burra.[8][1] However, as the final process also resulted in the abolition of the Terowie council, which was wholly merged into Hallett, Booborowie was divided only between the Hallett and new Burra Burra councils, ceasing to exist from 1 May 1935.[9][10] The amalgamation had been strongly opposed by the sitting council, who had argued they were large enough to stand alone.[11]

Chairmen[edit]

  • A. D. McDonald (1917) [12]
  • W. J. Cousins (1929) [13]

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b c Marsden, Susan (2012). "A History of South Australian Councils to 1936" (PDF). Local Government Association of South Australia. Retrieved 30 October 2015.
  2. ^ "DISTRICT OF BOOBOROWIE". Adelaide Observer. XXXII, (1753). South Australia. 8 May 1875. p. 5. Retrieved 22 September 2016 – via National Library of Australia.CS1 maint: extra punctuation (link)
  3. ^ "COUNTRY LETTERS". Adelaide Observer. XXXI, (1712). South Australia. 25 July 1874. p. 6. Retrieved 22 September 2016 – via National Library of Australia.CS1 maint: extra punctuation (link)
  4. ^ "The District Councils Act 1887 No. 419". Flinders University. Retrieved 14 November 2015.
  5. ^ "Booborowie". Regional Council of Goyder. Retrieved 22 September 2016.
  6. ^ "Booborowie History Walk" (PDF). burrahistory.info. Retrieved 22 September 2016.
  7. ^ "Former Booborowie Council Chambers". South Australian Heritage Register. Department of Environment, Water and Natural Resources. Retrieved 22 September 2016.
  8. ^ "Alteration Of Council Boundaries". Laura Standard and Crystal Brook Courier. XLVI, (2, 251). South Australia. 8 February 1935. p. 3. Retrieved 22 September 2016 – via National Library of Australia.CS1 maint: extra punctuation (link)
  9. ^ "District Council of Terowie". The Times And Northern Advertiser, Peterborough, South Australia. South Australia. 3 May 1935. p. 1. Retrieved 22 September 2016 – via National Library of Australia.
  10. ^ "DISTRICT COUNCIL OF BURRA". Burra Record. 56, (15). South Australia. 10 April 1935. p. 4. Retrieved 22 September 2016 – via National Library of Australia.CS1 maint: extra punctuation (link)
  11. ^ "DISTRICT COUNCIL OF BOOBOROWIE". Burra Record. 56, (19). South Australia. 8 May 1935. p. 4. Retrieved 22 September 2016 – via National Library of Australia.CS1 maint: extra punctuation (link)
  12. ^ "District Council of Booborowie". Burra Record. XXXIX, (34). South Australia. 22 August 1917. p. 3. Retrieved 22 September 2016 – via National Library of Australia.CS1 maint: extra punctuation (link)
  13. ^ "District Council of BOOBOROWIE". Burra Record. 50, (30). South Australia. 31 July 1929. p. 3. Retrieved 22 September 2016 – via National Library of Australia.CS1 maint: extra punctuation (link)

Coordinates: 33°33′46″S 138°45′45″E / 33.562778°S 138.7625°E / -33.562778; 138.7625