Diva (magazine)

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Diva
Diva-magazine-April2013.jpg
Cover of Diva magazine (April 2013)
EditorCarrie Lyell [1]
CategoriesLesbian
FrequencyMonthly
PublisherTwin Media Group
Year founded1994
First issueApril 1994
CompanyTwin Media Group
CountryUnited Kingdom
Based inLondon
LanguageEnglish
Websitewww.divamag.co.uk

DIVA is Europe's leading magazine for lesbians and bisexual women. Published monthly in the United Kingdom, it was first launched in March 1994 by Millivres Ltd, under the editorship of Frances Williams [2]. In 2016, publisher MPG sold the magazine to Twin Media Group, which is owned by Linda Riley.

In 2019, an expansion was announced, merging DIVA with Lesbian Box Office under a new company – DIVA Media Group – making DIVA the world's leading media brand for LGBTQI women.[3]

DIVA's editor is Carrie Lyell, who has held the position since May 2017, and is the fourth editor in the magazine's history. DIVA features articles by and for lesbians and bisexual women on a range of subjects, from celebrity interviews and in-depth news features, travel pieces and arts reviews. Celebrities including Ellen DeGeneres, Keira Knightley, Samira Wiley and Sarah Paulson have all appeared on the cover.

In November 2008, DIVA was published under the name "The Souvenir Issue" for the purpose of celebrating the 150th issue by including the cover pages of every issue that had been published since April 1994.[4]

As well as a monthly magazine, the DIVA brand now includes Radio DIVA, DIVA Literary Festival, DIVA Awards and DIVA Music Festival.

See also[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ "Say hello to the new editor of DIVA".
  2. ^ Georgina Turner (September 2008). "The road to the lesbian nation is not an easy one: us and them in Diva magazine". Social Semiotics. 18 (3): 377–388. doi:10.1080/10350330802217147.
  3. ^ Team, Editorial (2019-02-12). "DIVA joins with Lesbian Box Office to form DIVA Media Group ✨". DIVA MAGAZINE. Retrieved 2019-02-26.
  4. ^ "15 Women's Magazines That Don't Suck, Are Awesome". Autostraddle. 11 April 2012. Retrieved 27 October 2015.

External links[edit]