Division of Blaxland

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
Jump to navigation Jump to search

Blaxland
Australian House of Representatives Division
Division of BLAXLAND 2016.png
Division of Blaxland in New South Wales, as of the 2016 federal election.
Created1949
MPJason Clare
PartyLabor
NamesakeGregory Blaxland
Electors105,422 (2019)
Area61 km2 (23.6 sq mi)
DemographicInner Metropolitan

The Division of Blaxland is an Australian electoral division in the state of New South Wales.

History[edit]

Gregory Blaxland, the division's namesake

The division was created in 1949 and is named after Gregory Blaxland, a farmer and an early Australian explorer of the Blue Mountains in New South Wales.[1] The division has been a comfortably safe seat for Labor since its creation; western Sydney has been a Labor heartland for over a century. Initially created as a notional Lang Labor seat, the official ALP narrowly won it over former NSW Premier Jack Lang. This is the only election at which (official) Labor has won less than 56 percent of the two-party vote, as well as the only one in which it did not win an outright majority on the first count. Presently, it is the safest Labor seat in Australia, with a 19.5 percent swing required for the Liberals to win it.

Its most notable member has been Paul Keating, who was Prime Minister of Australia from 1991 until 1996 after having previously served as Treasurer of Australia from 1983 until 1991. In 2007, Keating's successor, Michael Hatton, lost preselection for this seat to current memberJason Clare, who was a staffer for former New South Wales Premier Bob Carr.[2]

Notably in 2017, the division had the highest percentage of "No" responses in the Australian Marriage Law Postal Survey, with 73.9% of the electorate's respondents to the survey responding "No".[3]

Boundaries[edit]

The division is based in the western suburbs of Sydney, and includes the working-class suburbs of Bass Hill, Berala, Birrong, Chester Hill, Georges Hall, Lansdowne, Lansvale, Potts Hill, Regents Park, Sefton, Villawood, and Yagoona; and parts of the business park and airport at Bankstown Airport; as well as parts of Auburn, Bankstown, Canley Vale, Carramar, Condell Park, Guildford, Lidcombe, Merrylands, South Granville, Villawood, and Yennora.

Members[edit]

Image Member Party Term Notes
  Eli James Harrison.jpg Jim Harrison
(1903–1976)
Labor 10 December 1949
29 September 1969
Previously a member of the New South Wales Legislative Council. Retired
  Paul Keating 1985.jpg Paul Keating
(1944–)
Labor 25 October 1969
23 April 1996
Served as minister under Whitlam and Hawke. Served as Deputy Prime Minister under Hawke. Served as Prime Minister from 1991 to 1996. Resigned in order to retire from politics
  No image.svg Michael Hatton
(1951–)
Labor 15 June 1996
17 October 2007
Lost preselection and retired
  Jason Clare, Beenleigh PCYC, August 2013 (cropped).jpg Jason Clare
(1972–)
Labor 24 November 2007
present
Served as minister under Gillard and Rudd. Incumbent

Election results[edit]

2019 Australian federal election: Blaxland[4]
Party Candidate Votes % ±
Labor Jason Clare 46,689 57.78 −5.53
Liberal Oz Guney 23,289 28.82 +4.00
Greens James Rooney 4,329 5.36 +0.73
Christian Democrats Veronica Rowe 4,173 5.16 −0.86
United Australia Nadeem Ashraf 2,328 2.88 +2.88
Total formal votes 80,808 86.70 −1.75
Informal votes 12,401 13.30 +1.75
Turnout 93,209 88.45 +1.20
Two-party-preferred result
Labor Jason Clare 52,299 64.72 −4.76
Liberal Oz Guney 28,509 35.28 +4.76
Labor hold Swing −4.76

References[edit]

  1. ^ "Division of Blaxland". Electorate profiles. Australian Electoral Commission.
  2. ^ Bowe, William. "Blaxland". House of Representatives 2007. The Poll Bludger. Retrieved 21 September 2007.
  3. ^ "Australian Marriage Law Postal Survey 2017 Response Final". Australian Bureau of Statistics. 15 November 2017.
  4. ^ Blaxland, NSW, Tally Room 2019, Australian Electoral Commission.

External links[edit]

Coordinates: 33°53′17″S 151°00′00″E / 33.888°S 151.000°E / -33.888; 151.000