Diyarbakır Province

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Diyarbakır Province

Diyarbakır ili
Location of Diyarbakır Province in Turkey
Location of Diyarbakır Province in Turkey
CountryTurkey
RegionSoutheast Anatolia
SubregionŞanlıurfa
Government
 • Electoral districtDiyarbakır
 • GovernorHasan Basri Güzeloğlu
Area
 • Total15,355 km2 (5,929 sq mi)
Population
(2018)[1]
 • Total1,732,396
 • Density110/km2 (290/sq mi)
Area code(s)0412
Vehicle registration21

Diyarbakır Province (Turkish: Diyarbakır ili, Kurdish: Parêzgeha Amed‎) is a province in southeastern Turkey. The province covers an area of 15,355 km2 and its population is 1,528,958. The provincial capital is the city of Diyarbakır.

It has been home to many civilisations and the surrounding area including itself is home to many Mesolithic era stone carvings and artifacts. The province has been ruled by the Akkadians, Hurrians, Mittani, Medes, Hittites, Armenians, Neo-Babylonians, Achaemenids, Greeks, Romans, Parthia, Byzantium, Sassanids, Arabs, Seljuk Empire, Mongol Empire, Safavid dynasty, Marwanids, and Ayyubids.

The majority of the province's population today is Kurdish.[2]

Districts[edit]

Diyarbakır province is divided into 14 districts (capital district in bold):

Population[edit]

Assyrian and Armenian population in Diyarbakır Province in 1915-1916[3]
Sect Before World War I Disappeared (killed) After World War I
Armenians Gregorians (Apostolic) 60,000 58,000 (97%) 2,000
Armenian Catholics 12,500 11,500 (92%) 1,000
Assyrians Chaldean Catholics 11,120 10,010 (90%) 1,110
Syriac Catholic 5,600 3,450 (62%) 2,150
Syriac Orthodox 84,725 60,725 (72%) 24,000
Protestants 725 500 (69%) 2,150

References[edit]

  1. ^ "Population of provinces by years - 2000-2018". Turkish Statistical Institute. Retrieved 9 March 2019.
  2. ^ Watts, Nicole F. (2010). Activists in Office: Kurdish Politics and Protest in Turkey (Studies in Modernity and National Identity). Seattle: University of Washington Press. p. 167. ISBN 978-0-295-99050-7.
  3. ^ Gaunt, David. Massacres, Resistance, Protectors: Muslim-Christian Relations in Eastern Anatolia during World War I. Piscataway, N.J.: Gorgias Press, 2006, p. 433.

External links[edit]

Coordinates: 38°08′32″N 40°16′16″E / 38.14222°N 40.27111°E / 38.14222; 40.27111