Djadjawurrung language

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Djadjawurrung
Region Victoria
Ethnicity Dja Dja Wurrung people
Extinct (date missing)
Pama–Nyungan
Language codes
ISO 639-3 dja
Glottolog None
AIATSIS[2] S31.1
Kulin Map.PNG
The five Kulin nations. Djadjawurrung is in the northwest in blue.

Djadjawurrung (also Jaara, Ngurai-illam-wurrung) is one of the extinct Indigenous Australian languages spoken by the Jaara also known as Dja Dja Wurrung people of the Kulin Nation of Central Victoria. Djadjawurrung was spoken by 16 clans around Murchison, the central highlands region, east to Kyneton, west to the Pyrenees, north to Boort and south to the Great Dividing Range.

Phonology[edit]

Consonants[edit]

Labial Alveolar Retroflex Palatal Velar
Stop ⟨p⟩ p ⟨t⟩ t ⟨rt⟩ ʈ ⟨tj⟩, ⟨yt⟩ c [a] ⟨k⟩ k
Nasal ⟨m⟩ m ⟨n⟩ n ⟨rn⟩ ɳ ⟨ny⟩, ⟨yn⟩ ɲ [a] ⟨ng⟩ ŋ
Lateral ⟨l⟩ l ⟨rl⟩ ɭ ⟨ly⟩, ⟨yl⟩ ʎ [a]
Rhotic ⟨rr⟩ r ⟨r⟩ ɽ [b]
Approximant ⟨w⟩ w ⟨y⟩ j
  1. ^ a b c The spellings ⟨ny⟩ and ⟨ly⟩ are spelled as ⟨yn⟩ and ⟨yl⟩ in syllable-final position, ⟨tj⟩ can also be spelled ⟨yt⟩ if it is an unreleased stop (it is simply spelt as ⟨tj⟩ released).
  2. ^ The retroflex rhotic may be an approximant, or a flap.

Vowels[edit]

There are four vowels noted: /i e a u/. They may be also be phonetically written as /i ɛ~e a ʊ~u/.[3][4]

References[edit]

  1. ^ R. M. W. Dixon, Australian Languages: Their Nature and Development: v. 1 (Cambridge Language Surveys). Cambridge University Press, 2002. ISBN 978-0-521-47378-1
  2. ^ Djadjawurrung at the Australian Indigenous Languages Database, Australian Institute of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Studies
  3. ^ Blake, Barry J. "Dialects of Western Kulin, Western Victoria Yartwatjali, Tjapwurrung, Djadjawurrung" (PDF). Retrieved 2017-03-03.
  4. ^ Blake, Barry. 2016

External links[edit]