Docosapentaenoic acid

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Docosapentaenoic acid designates any straight chain 22:5 fatty acid.

Isomers[edit]

See essential fatty acid#nomenclature for nomenclature.

all-cis-4,7,10,13,16-docosapentaenoic acid (osbond acid)[edit]

The chemical structure of osbond acid showing physiological numbering (red) and chemical numbering (blue) conventions.


all-cis-4,7,10,13,16-docosapentaenoic acid is an ω-6 fatty acid with the trivial name osbond acid. It is formed by an elongation and desaturation of arachidonic acid 20:4 ω-6.

all-cis-7,10,13,16,19-docosapentaenoic acid (clupanodonic acid)[edit]

The chemical structure of clupanodonic acid showing physiological numbering (red) and chemical numbering (blue) conventions.


all-cis-7,10,13,16,19-docosapentaenoic acid is an ω-3 fatty acid with the trivial name clupanodonic acid, commonly called DPA. It is an intermediary between eicosapentaenoic acid (EPA, 20:5 ω-3) and docosahexaenoic acid (DHA, 22:6 ω-3).

Nutrition[edit]

Docosapentaenoic acid (DPA) is an omega-3 fatty acid that is structurally similar to eicosapentaenoic acid (EPA) with two more carbon chain units.[1]

Dietary sources

These are the top five sources for DPA according to the USDA Agricultural Research Service:[2]

  1. Fish oil, menhaden .668 22:5 n-3 (DPA) (g) Per Measure
  2. Fish oil, salmon .407 22:5 n-3 (DPA) (g) Per Measure
  3. Salmon, red (sockeye), filets with skin, smoked (Alaska Native) 0.335 22:5 n-3 (DPA) (g) Per Measure
  4. Fish, salmon, Atlantic, farmed, raw .334 22:5 n-3 (DPA) (g) Per Measure
  5. Beef, variety meats and by-products, brain, cooked, simmered 22:5 n-3 (DPA) (g) Per Measure

Seal meat and human breast milk are rich in DPA.[1]

Functions[edit]

Clupanodonic acid, an omega-3 fatty acid, along with its metabolite DHA and other long chain omega-3 fatty acids, is under study to determine properties of omega-3 fats in humans, such as in inflammation mechanisms.[3]

References[edit]

See also[edit]