Dodecatheon meadia

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Dodecatheon meadia
Dodecatheon meadia 01.JPG

Secure (NatureServe)
Scientific classification
Kingdom: Plantae
(unranked): Angiosperms
(unranked): Eudicots
(unranked): Asterids
Order: Ericales
Family: Primulaceae
Genus: Dodecatheon
Species: D. meadia
Binomial name
Dodecatheon meadia
L. 1753 not Greene 1888
Synonyms

Dodecatheon meadia, commonly known as shooting star, is a species of flowering plant in the primrose family (Primulaceae). It is native to North America, where it is found in the eastern United States, spanning north from Minnesota and New York, south to Texas and Florida.[1]

It has a wide natural habitat, being found in both forests and prairies. It is most often found in calcareous areas.[2][3] It can be locally common in some areas of its range, however, it can become rare on its geographic edges.[2]

Description[edit]

Dodecatheon meadia is perennial, growing to 8–20 in (203–508 mm) high. Its flowers that emerge from a basal rosette of leaves (scapose). It blooms in the spring. The flowers are nodding, and from an umbel. Its seeds are dispersed by gusts of wind that shake the erect scapes.[4]

This species is geographically widespread, and has considerable morphological variation across its range. Most southern population have white petals, while northern populations have lavender to magenta petals.[2]

Cultivars[edit]

Dodecatheon meadia 'Goliath' is a cultivar that grows larger flowers on taller scapes.[5]

D. meadia[6] and the white-flowered form D. meadia f. album have both gained the Royal Horticultural Society's Award of Garden Merit.[7][8]

References[edit]

  1. ^ "Dodecatheon meadia". County-level distribution map from the North American Plant Atlas (NAPA). Biota of North America Program (BONAP). 2013. Retrieved 29 April 2018. 
  2. ^ a b c Dodecatheon meadia Flora of North America
  3. ^ Alan Weakley (2015). "Flora of the Southern and Mid-Atlantic States". 
  4. ^ Shooting Star, Dodecatheon meadia Illinois Wildflowers
  5. ^ Steiner, Lynn M. 2006. Landscaping with native plants of Michigan. St. Paul, MN: MBI Pub. Co. Page 82.
  6. ^ "RHS Plantfinder - Dodecatheon meadia". Retrieved 12 February 2018. 
  7. ^ "Dodecatheon meadia f. album". Royal Horticultural Society. Retrieved 24 July 2013. 
  8. ^ "AGM Plants - Ornamental" (PDF). Royal Horticultural Society. July 2017. p. 29. Retrieved 6 February 2018. 

External links[edit]