Doernbecher Children's Hospital

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Doernbecher Children's Hospital
Oregon Health & Science University
Doernbecher Children's Hospital logo.png
Doernbecher Childrens Hospital - from east 2 - Portland Oregon.jpg
Main entrance
Doernbecher Children's Hospital is located in Portland, Oregon
Doernbecher Children's Hospital
Geography
Location Portland, Multnomah County, Oregon, United States
Coordinates 45°29′59″N 122°41′19″W / 45.4998°N 122.6885°W / 45.4998; -122.6885Coordinates: 45°29′59″N 122°41′19″W / 45.4998°N 122.6885°W / 45.4998; -122.6885
Organization
Care system Public
Hospital type Pediatric
Links
Website ohsudoernbecher.com
Lists Hospitals in Oregon

Doernbecher Children's Hospital is an academic teaching children's hospital associated with Oregon Health & Science University located in Portland, Oregon. Established in 1926, it is the first full-service children's hospital in the Pacific Northwest, and provides full-spectrum pediatric care. Doernbecher Children's hospital is consistently ranked by U.S. News & World Report as one of the United States' top pediatric hospitals in multiple medical specialties.

Rankings[edit]

In 2015-2016, the U.S. News & World Report was ranked nationally for the following medical specialties: #25 pediatric nephrology, #27 pediatric oncology, #31 neonatology, #34 pediatric neurology and neurosurgery, #40 pediatric pulmonology, #49 pediatric cardiology and heart surgery, and #49 pediatric urology.[1]

History[edit]

The hospital opened in 1926 on Portland's Marquam Hill.[2] Doernbecher Children's Hospital developed the nation's first academic children's eye clinic in 1949 and Oregon's first neonatal intensive care center in 1968. In 1998, Doernbecher built a new state-of-the-art medical complex to replace the original hospital.[3] The new facility was named as one of the major building engineering achievements of the last 100 years by the International Federation of Consulting Engineers in 2013.[4] Designed by ZGF Architects, the 250,000-square-foot (23,000 m2) building traverses a canyon with two streets running under the building.[4]

Namesake[edit]

Construction of the six-story[2] hospital in 1925–26 was financed primarily by a donation from a charitable trust managed by the heirs of Frank Silas Doernbecher (1861–1921), a prominent Portland businessman who established the Doernbecher Manufacturing Company in Portland in 1900.[5] The company was Portland's leading furniture manufacturer,[6] and grew to become one of the country's largest furniture makers.[5] Frank Doernbecher had stipulated in his will that the money, which amounted to $200,000, be given "to some charity for the benefit of the people of Oregon".[7] The hospital's original name was the Doernbecher Memorial Hospital for Children, and from the start it was part of the University of Oregon Medical School,[7] which in the 1970s became Oregon Health & Science University.

See also[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ "Doernbecher Children's Hospital at Oregon Health and Science University". U.S. News & World Report. Retrieved 13 February 2016. 
  2. ^ a b "Children's Hospital Ready For Patients: Doernbecher Memorial Dedication Draws Throng". (July 31, 1926). The Morning Oregonian, p. 6.
  3. ^ http://www.ohsu.edu/xd/about/facts/history.cfm
  4. ^ a b Culverwell, Wendy (October 2, 2013). "What Doernbecher has in common with the Sydney Opera House". Portland Business Journal. Retrieved 4 October 2013. 
  5. ^ a b Poida, Walter J. (1977). "National Register of Historic Places Inventory/Nomination Form: Frank Silas Doernbecher House" (PDF). National Park Service. Retrieved May 13, 2012. 
  6. ^ MacColl, E. Kimbark (1979). The Growth of a City: Power and Politics in Portland, Oregon, 1915 to 1950. The Georgian Press. pp. 378, 475. ISBN 0-9603408-1-5. 
  7. ^ a b "Memorial Hospital Has [First] Birthday Party: Doernbecher Invites Friends to See Institution". (August 3, 1927). The Morning Oregonian, p. 4.

External links[edit]

Media related to Doernbecher Children's Hospital at Wikimedia Commons