Doesn't Somebody Want to Be Wanted

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
Jump to navigation Jump to search
"Doesn't Somebody Want to Be Wanted"
Doesn't Somebody Want to Be Wanted.jpg
Single by The Partridge Family
from the album Up to Date
B-side "You Are Always on My Mind"
Released February 1971
Recorded 1970
Genre Pop
Length 2:49
Label Bell Records
Songwriter(s) Mike Appel, Jim Cretecos, Wes Farrell
Producer(s) Wes Farrell
The Partridge Family singles chronology
"I Think I Love You"
(1970)
"Doesn't Somebody Want to Be Wanted"
(1971)
"I'll Meet You Halfway"
(1971)
"I Think I Love You"
(1970)
"Doesn't Somebody Want to Be Wanted"
(1971)
"I'll Meet You Halfway"
(1971)

"Doesn't Somebody Want to Be Wanted" is a song written by Mike Appel, Jim Cretecos, and Wes Farrell and was recorded by The Partridge Family for their 1971 album, Up to Date.[1] The song went to #6 on The Billboard Hot 100 in 1971 and was on the charts for 12 weeks.[2]

The song went to #1 in Canada.[3] The song also reached #6 in France and #9 in Australia. It was named the #13 song of 1971 on the Cashbox charts.[4] The song was certified as a gold disc in March 1971.[5]

But David Cassidy hated the song.[6] He didn't think it was a good song at all and hated the idea he had to talk in the middle of it so much so he refused to do it.[6]

This caused consternation with the studio and the record company, where the heads of both Bell Records and Screen Gems, both owned by Columbia Pictures, got involved.[6] Shooting of The Partridge Family was stopped so his manager and agent could talk to him over the issue.[6] It was suggested to Cassidy that the song would achieve greater commercial success with the spoken interlude included.[6]

They put pressure on him until he caved in and did the record as requested. When it was finished, he begged them not to release it.[6] "It was horrible, I was embarrassed by it. I still can't listen to that record."[6]

This was also the song that was playing before the Emergency Broadcast System False Alarm of 1971 on WOWO.

Chart performance[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ Lindsay Planer (1970-09-25). "Up to Date - The Partridge Family | Songs, Reviews, Credits". AllMusic. Retrieved 2016-10-03. 
  2. ^ "Artist Search for "the partridge family"". AllMusic. Retrieved 2016-10-03. 
  3. ^ "Item Display - RPM - Library and Archives Canada". Collectionscanada.gc.ca. Retrieved 2016-10-03. 
  4. ^ a b "Archived copy". Archived from the original on 2015-06-26. Retrieved 2016-05-30. 
  5. ^ "Song artist 754 - The Partridge Family". Tsort.info. 2007-10-08. Retrieved 2016-10-03. 
  6. ^ a b c d e f g C'Mon Get Happy - Fear and Loathing on the Partridge Family bus by David Cassidy and Chip Deffaa, Warner Books Inc, 1994. pp 70–71 ISBN 0-446-39531-5
  7. ^ "Archived copy". Archived from the original on 2016-10-01. Retrieved 2016-10-03. 
  8. ^ "Archived copy". Archived from the original on 2016-09-21. Retrieved 2016-06-04. 
  9. ^ "flavour of new zealand - search listener". Flavourofnz.co.nz. Retrieved 2016-10-03. 
  10. ^ Joel Whitburn's Top Pop Singles 1955-1990 - ISBN 0-89820-089-X
  11. ^ "Archived copy". Archived from the original on 2016-02-16. Retrieved 2016-06-04. 
  12. ^ "Australian Chart Book". Austchartbook.com.au. Archived from the original on 2016-03-05. Retrieved 2016-10-03. 
  13. ^ "Item Display - RPM - Library and Archives Canada". Collectionscanada.gc.ca. Retrieved 2016-10-03. 
  14. ^ "Top 100 Hits of 1971/Top 100 Songs of 1971". Musicoutfitters.com. Retrieved 2016-10-03. 
  15. ^ Billboard. Books.google.com. 1971-12-25. p. 15. Retrieved 2016-10-03. 

External links[edit]

Preceded by
"Have You Ever Seen the Rain?" by Creedence Clearwater Revival
Canadian RPM 100 number-one single
March 27, 1971 (one week)
Succeeded by
"She's a Lady" by Tom Jones