Doliskana

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Doliskana Monastery
დოლისყანის მონასტერი
DOLISKANA2.jpg
Basic information
Location Province of Artvin, Northeast Turkey (historic Georgian principality of Klarjeti)
Architectural description
Architectural type Monastery, Church
Completed tenth century

Doliskana (Georgian: დოლისყანა, Turkish: Dolishane) is a Georgian medieval Orthodox monastery in the Medieval Georgian kingdom of Klarjeti (modern-day Artvin Province of Turkey). It is now used as a mosque. Its construction was finished in the mid 10th century, during the rule of Sumbat I of Iberia. It is located high above the right bank of the Imerkhevi River.

The inscriptions[edit]

On the exterior walls of the church are several short inscriptions in Georgian written in the Georgian Asomtavruli script. One mentions the prince and titular king Sumbat I of Iberia.[1] The inscriptions have been dated to the first half of the 10th century.[2]

Inscription 1[edit]

  • Translation: "Christ, glorify our King Sumbat with longevity."[3]

Inscription 2[edit]

  • Translation: "Saint Michael, Saint Gabriel."[4]

Inscription 3[edit]

  • Translation: "Created by the hand of bishop Gabriel."[5]

Inscription 4[edit]

  • Translation: "Saint Stephen, have mercy on priest Gabriel."[6]

Inscription 5[edit]

  • Translation: "Jesus Christ, have mercy on the church of our kings, o Christ have mercy."[7]

References[edit]

  1. ^ Eastmond, Antony, Royal Imagery in Medieval Georgia, 1998, pp. 224-226
  2. ^ Shoshiashvili, p. 290
  3. ^ Marr, p. 185; Shoshiashvili, p. 291; Djobadze, i. 15 ch. 81-83
  4. ^ Marr, p. 184; Shoshiashvili, pp. 291-292; Djobadze, i. 16-17, ch. 84-85
  5. ^ Djobadze, i. 18, ch. 85
  6. ^ Shoshiashvili, pp. 292-293
  7. ^ Marr, p. 186; Shoshiashvili, pp. 293-294

Bibliography[edit]

  • Marr, Nicholas, The Diary of travel in Shavsheti and Klarjeti, St. Petersburg, 1911
  • Djobadze, Wachtang, Early medieval Georgian monasteries in historical Tao, Klarjeti and Shavsheti, 2007
  • Shoshiashvili, N. Lapidary Inscriptions, I, Tbilisi, 1980

External links[edit]

Coordinates: 41°09′57″N 41°57′08″E / 41.16583°N 41.95222°E / 41.16583; 41.95222