Dominic Turgeon

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Dominic Turgeon
Dominic Turgeon (38774758280).jpg
Born (1996-02-25) February 25, 1996 (age 23)
Pointe-Claire, Quebec, Canada
Height 6 ft 2 in (188 cm)
Weight 200 lb (91 kg; 14 st 4 lb)
Position Centre
Shoots Left
NHL team (P)
Cur. team
Detroit Red Wings
Grand Rapids Griffins (AHL)
NHL Draft 63rd overall, 2014
Detroit Red Wings
Playing career 2016–present

Dominic Turgeon (born February 25, 1996) is a Canadian-born American professional ice hockey player for the Grand Rapids Griffins of the American Hockey League (AHL) as a prospect to the Detroit Red Wings of the National Hockey League (NHL). Turgeon was drafted 63rd overall by the Red Wings in the 2014 NHL Entry Draft.

Early life[edit]

Turgeon was born on February 25, 1996, in Pointe-Claire, Quebec, to Pierre and Elisabeth Turgeon, while his father was a member of the Montreal Canadiens. He was raised in Chesterfield, Missouri and Arlington, Texas before his family settled in Cherry Hills Village, Colorado and has three sisters, Alexandra, Elizabeth and Valerie. Elizabeth died in a car accident on December 23, 2010.[1][2]

Playing career[edit]

Amateur[edit]

Turgeon was drafted 64th overall by the Portland Winterhawks in the 2011 WHL Bantam Draft.[3] During the 2011–12 season, Turgeon made his Western Hockey League (WHL) debut appearing in one game.[4]

Turgeon played for the USA Hockey National Team Development Program during the 2012–13 season, where he recorded three assists in seven games.[4]

During the 2012–13 season, Turgeon recorded three goals and five assists in 54 regular season games for the Portland Winterhawks and won the Ed Chynoweth Cup.[5]

During the 2013–14 season, Turgeon recorded ten goals and 21 assists in 65 regular season games for the Winterhawks. During the playoffs, he recorded two goals and six assists in 21 playoff games, advancing to the WHL Finals for the second straight season, before losing to the WHL Champions Edmonton Oil Kings.[4]

During the 2014–15 season, Turgeon recorded 18 goals and 25 assists in 67 regular season games for the Winterhawks. During the playoffs, he recorded eight goals and one assist in 17 playoff games, losing in the Western Conference Finals to the eventual WHL Champions Kelowna Rockets. On September 25, 2015, Turgeon was named team captain of the Winterhawks.[6]

During the 2015–16 season, Turgeon recorded 36 goals and 34 assists in 72 regular season games for the Winterhawks, leading the team in scoring. During the playoffs, he was limited to just two playoff games after having season-ending surgery on his right shoulder.[7]

Professional[edit]

On May 9, 2015, Turgeon signed a three-year entry level contract with the Detroit Red Wings.[8]

During the 2016–17 season, Turgeon recorded six goals and 12 assists in 71 games for the Grand Rapids Griffins. During the 2017 Calder Cup playoffs, he recorded one goal and one assist in 19 games, and won the Calder Cup.[9]

On January 13, 2018, Turgeon was recalled by the Red Wings. Prior to being recalled he recorded nine goals and 14 assists in 40 games for the Griffins.[10] He made his NHL debut for the Red Wings in a game against the Chicago Blackhawks the next day. He went on to skate in four games for the Red Wings, averaging 9:36 of ice time and recording two shots on goal. On January 23, he was returned to the Griffins.[11]

On July 26, 2019, the Red Wings re-signed Turgeon to a one-year, two-way contract extension.[12]

International play[edit]

Medal record
Representing  United States
Ice hockey
World U-17 Hockey Challenge
Bronze medal – third place 2013 Canada
Ivan Hlinka Memorial Tournament
Silver medal – second place 2013 Czech Republic / Slovakia

Born to a Canadian father and an American mother, Turgeon has dual citizenship and represented the United States at the 2013 World U-17 Hockey Challenge, where he recorded three assists in six games, and won a bronze medal.[13] Later that year he again represented the United States at the 2013 Ivan Hlinka Memorial Tournament, where he recorded one assist in five games and won a silver medal.[14]

Personal life[edit]

Turgeon is the son of former NHL player Pierre Turgeon, and the nephew of Sylvain Turgeon.[15][16]

Career statistics[edit]

Regular season and playoffs[edit]

    Regular season   Playoffs
Season Team League GP G A Pts PIM GP G A Pts PIM
2011–12 Portland Winterhawks WHL 1 0 0 0 0
2012–13 U.S. National Development Team USHL 7 0 3 3 0
2012–13 Portland Winterhawks WHL 54 3 5 8 2 5 0 0 0 0
2013–14 Portland Winterhawks WHL 65 10 21 31 31 21 2 6 8 18
2014–15 Portland Winterhawks WHL 67 18 25 43 36 17 8 1 9 0
2015–16 Portland Winterhawks WHL 72 36 34 70 22 2 0 1 1 0
2016–17 Grand Rapids Griffins AHL 71 6 12 18 6 19 1 1 2 2
2017–18 Grand Rapids Griffins AHL 69 14 18 32 23
2017–18 Detroit Red Wings NHL 5 0 0 0 2
2018–19 Grand Rapids Griffins AHL 72 6 14 20 41 3 1 2 3 0
2018–19 Detroit Red Wings NHL 4 0 0 0 0
NHL totals 9 0 0 0 2

International[edit]

Year Team Event Result   GP G A Pts PIM
2013 United States U17 3rd, bronze medalist(s) 6 0 3 3 0
2013 United States Ivan Hlinka 2nd, silver medalist(s) 5 1 0 0 0
Junior totals 11 1 3 3 0

Awards and honors[edit]

Award Year
WHL
Ed Chynoweth Cup (Portland Winterhawks) 2012–13 [5]
AHL
Calder Cup (Grand Rapids Griffins) 2016–17 [17]

References[edit]

  1. ^ "Colorado-raised Dominic Turgeon signs with Detroit Red Wings". The Denver Post. April 24, 2016. Retrieved January 14, 2018.
  2. ^ "Pierre Turgeon's daughter killed". ESPN. December 26, 2010. Retrieved January 14, 2018.
  3. ^ "Winterhawks Sign Dominic Turgeon". Portland Winterhawks. February 15, 2012. Retrieved January 14, 2018.
  4. ^ a b c "Hockey's Future - Dominic Turgeon". hockeysfuture.com. Retrieved January 14, 2018.
  5. ^ a b "Winterhawks Win Ed Chynoweth Cup". Western Hockey League. May 13, 2013. Retrieved January 14, 2018.
  6. ^ "Dominic Turgeon Named Captain". Portland Winterhawks. September 25, 2015. Retrieved January 14, 2018.
  7. ^ "Winterhawks lose Turgeon to shoulder surgery". Portland Tribune. March 29, 2016. Retrieved January 14, 2018.
  8. ^ "Wings sign Turgeon to entry-level deal". Detroit Red Wings. May 9, 2015. Retrieved January 14, 2018.
  9. ^ Wakiji, Dana (January 13, 2018). "Abdelkader, Helm injured; Turgeon called up from Grand Rapids". Detroit Red Wings. Retrieved January 14, 2018.
  10. ^ Kujawa, Kyle (January 13, 2018). "Red Wings recall center Dominic Turgeon". Detroit Red Wings. Retrieved January 14, 2018.
  11. ^ DiFilippo, Alex (January 23, 2018). "Detroit assigns Turgeon and Hicketts to Grand Rapids". NHL.com. Detroit Red Wings. Retrieved January 23, 2018.
  12. ^ "Red Wings re-sign Dominic Turgeon". Detroit Red Wings. Retrieved July 26, 2019.
  13. ^ "2013 World Under-17 Challenge Roster Announced". USA Hockey National Team Development Program. December 20, 2012. Retrieved January 14, 2018.
  14. ^ "USA Hockey names team for Ivan Hlinka Tournament". National Hockey League. July 3, 2013. Retrieved January 14, 2018.
  15. ^ Allen, Kevin (November 29, 2017). "Kings take page from NFL to increase scoring with offensive coordinator Pierre Turgeon". USA Today. Retrieved January 14, 2018.
  16. ^ Roose, Bill (July 23, 2015). "Wings Encounter: Dominic Turgeon". Detroit Red Wings. Retrieved January 14, 2018.
  17. ^ Wakiji, Dana (June 13, 2017). "Grand Rapids Griffins win Calder Cup at home". Detroit Red Wings. Retrieved January 14, 2018.

External links[edit]