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Dominica at the 2016 Summer Olympics

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Dominica at the
2016 Summer Olympics
Flag of Dominica.svg
IOC code DMA
NOC Dominica Olympic Committee
Website www.doc.dm
in Rio de Janeiro
Competitors 2 in 1 sport
Flag bearer Yordanys Durañona
Medals
Gold
0
Silver
0
Bronze
0
Total
0
Summer Olympics appearances (overview)

Dominica participated in the 2016 Summer Olympics in Rio de Janeiro from 5 to 21 August 2016. The country's participation in Rio marked its sixth appearance in the Summer Olympics since its debut in the 1996 Summer Olympics. The delegation included two athletes: Yordanys Durañona and Thea LaFond, both competing in the men's and women's triple jump, respectively. The former qualified for the Games by meeting qualification standards while the latter entered the quadrennial event through a wildcard place. Neither athlete progressed farther than the first round of their events.

Background[edit]

Dominica participated in six Summer Olympic Games between its debut at the 1996 Summer Olympics in Atlanta, United States and the 2016 Summer Olympics in Rio de Janeiro, Brazil.[1] The highest number of athletes sent by Dominica to a Summer Games is six to the 1996 Olympics.[1] No Dominican athlete has ever won a medal at the Olympic Games.[1] Dominica participated in the Rio de Janeiro Summer Games from 5 August to 21 August 2016.[1]

The Dominica National Olympic Committee (NOC) selected one athlete (Durañona) through qualification standards. NOCs may enter athletes regardless of time (one athlete per sex) if they have no athletes meeting the entry standard. This made it possible for Dominica to have two representatives in the sport.[2] The two athletes that were selected to compete in the Rio Games were Yordanys Durañona in the men's triple jump and Thea LaFond in the women's triple jump.[1] Durañona was selected as the flag bearer for both the opening and closing ceremonies.[3][4]

Athletics (track and field)[edit]

Both athletes participated in the triple jump event. Yordanys Durañona qualified for the male's event by meeting qualification standards.[5][6][7] Dominica used their wildcard spot for Thea LaFond in the women's triple jump.[8] Durañona was among seven other people to scratch all three of their attempted jumps, failing to achieve a mark and therefore not having a position.[9] Meanwhile, Thea LaFond ranked dead last with a score of 12.82 metres (42.1 ft). LaFond said that in the middle of her first jump, she felt that she pulled her hamstring and perhaps the same with her middle finger. After she was eliminated, LaFond said that the injury "was the greatest chip on my shoulder that the universe could have ever thrown [her] way."[10]

Key
  • Note–Ranks given for track events are within the athlete's heat only

Field events
Athlete Event Qualification Final
Distance Position Distance Position
Yordanys Durañona Men's triple jump NM Did not advance
Thea LaFond Women's triple jump 12.82 37 Did not advance

See also[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b c d e "Countries – Dominica". Dominica Olympic Committee. Retrieved 16 June 2017. 
  2. ^ "Qualification System – Games of the XXXI Olympiad – Athletics". IAAF. Retrieved 15 July 2016. 
  3. ^ "Rio 2016 Opening Ceremony - Flag Bearers" (PDF). IOC. 5 August 2016. Retrieved 16 June 2017. 
  4. ^ "Rio 2016 Closing Ceremony - Flag Bearers" (PDF). IOC. 21 August 2016. Retrieved 16 June 2017. 
  5. ^ "Triple Jump - men senior outdoor 2016". iaaf.org. International Association of Athletics Federation. Retrieved 6 July 2017. 
  6. ^ "IAAF Games of the XXX Olympiad – Rio 2016 Entry Standards" (PDF). IAAF. Retrieved 18 April 2015. 
  7. ^ Stewart, Megan. "Table for one? Meet the 10 smallest delegations at Rio 2016". Rio 2016. Archived from the original on 21 September 2016. Retrieved 28 July 2016. 
  8. ^ "Two to represent Dominica at 2016 Olympic Games". www.dominicavibes.dm. Dominica Vibes News. 18 July 2016. Retrieved 6 July 2017. 
  9. ^ "Triple Jump Summary | The XXXI Olympic Games". iaaf.org. International Association of Athletics Federation. Retrieved 6 July 2017. 
  10. ^ Torres, Aaron (4 July 2017). "After an Olympic low, Maryland triple-jumper takes a different approach to succeed". The Washington Post. ISSN 0190-8286. Retrieved 6 July 2017. 

External links[edit]