Dominique Gisin

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Dominique Gisin
— Alpine skier —
Dominique Gisin Altenmarkt-Zauchensee 2011.jpg
Gisin in January 2011
Disciplines Downhill, super-G, giant slalom, slalom,
combined
Club Engelberg
Born (1986-06-04) 4 June 1986 (age 32)
Visp,[1] Switzerland
Height 1.72 m (5 ft 7 12 in)
World Cup debut 2 December 2005 (age 20)
Retired 19 March 2015 (age 29)
Website dominiquegisin.ch
Olympics
Teams 2 – (2010, 2014)
Medals 1 (1 gold)
World Championships
Teams 5 – (200715)
Medals 0
World Cup
Seasons 9 – (200715)
Wins 3 – (2 DH, 1 SG)
Podiums 7 – (5 DH, 2 SG)
Overall titles 0 – (11th in 2014)
Discipline titles 0 – (4th in DH, 2009)

Dominique Gisin (German pronunciation: ['gɪzɪn]; born 4 June 1985) is a retired World Cup alpine ski racer and Olympic gold medalist from Switzerland. She is the older sister of alpine ski racers Marc and Michelle Gisin.

Career[edit]

Born in Visp[1] in the canton of Valais, Gisin made her World Cup debut in December 2005. Her first podium was in Altenmarkt-Zauchensee, Austria, where she placed second in the downhill on 13 January 2007. Two years later in January 2009, she gained her first World Cup victory, also a downhill at Altenmarkt-Zauchensee, with the same time as Anja Pärson.

At the Winter Olympics in 2014, she tied for first in the downhill with Tina Maze and both were awarded gold medals.[2] It was the first-ever tie for gold in an alpine event at the Olympics, though several times previously competitors have tied for second, so that two silver medals were awarded (and no bronze).[3] As a result, Gisin was named as Swiss Sportswoman of the Year for 2014.[4]

Through March 2014, Gisin has 3 World Cup victories, 7 podiums, and 42 top ten finishes.[5] Her younger siblings Marc and Michelle also compete as alpine ski racers.[6]

In March 2015 Gisin announced her retirement from competition at the World Cup Finals meeting at Méribel.[7]

Away from skiing, Gisin learned to fly as a teenager and joined the Swiss Air Force to train as a fighter pilot, before being released due to knee injuries incurred through her skiing career.[8]

World Cup results[edit]

Season standings[edit]

Season Age Overall Slalom Giant
slalom
Super-G Downhill Combined
2007 21 34  –  –  – 10 38
2008 22 47  –  – 44 26 25
2009 23 21 44 4 19
2010 24 24 12 14 28
2011 25 17 6 9 11
2012 26 25 31 22 12
2013 27 15 54 10 15 19 24
2014 28 11 15 12 9 14
2015 29 16 19 14 16 6

Race podiums[edit]

  • 3 wins – (2 DH, 1 SG)
  • 7 podiums – (5 DH, 2 SG)
Season Date Location Discipline Place
2007 13 Jan 2007 Zauchensee, Austria Downhill 2nd
2009 18 Jan 2009 Zauchensee, Austria Downhill 1st
24 Jan 2009 Cortina d'Ampezzo, Italy Downhill 1st
2010 7 Mar 2010    Crans-Montana, Switzerland Super-G 1st
2011 4 Dec 2010 Lake Louise, Canada Downhill 3rd
9 Jan 2011 Zauchensee, Austria Super-G 3rd
2012 2 Dec 2011 Lake Louise, Canada Downhill 3rd

World Championship results[edit]

  Year    Age   Slalom  Giant
 slalom 
Super-G Downhill Combined
2007 21 5 DNF
2009 23 DNF
2011 25 DNF 8 4
2013 27 DNF1 10 DNF 10
2015 29 19

Olympic results[edit]

  Year    Age   Slalom  Giant
 slalom 
Super-G Downhill Combined
2010 24 DNF
2014 28 10 DNF 1 5

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b sport-reference.com
  2. ^ http://www.fis-ski.com/alpine-skiing/events-and-places/event=33446/race=75253/index.html
  3. ^ Mintz, Geoff (12 February 2014). "Tie at the top means double gold for Gisin, Maze". Ski Racing. Retrieved 12 February 2014.
  4. ^ "Gisin named Swiss sportswoman of the year". Federation Internationale de Ski. 15 December 2014. Retrieved 15 December 2014.
  5. ^ Ski-db.com – Dominique Gisin – profile
  6. ^ "Dominique Gisin: "Sölden is the goal"". Fédération Internationale de Ski. 31 August 2012. Retrieved 17 December 2013.
  7. ^ Zaccardi, Nick (19 March 2015). "Dominique Gisin, co-Olympic downhill champion, announces retirement". NBCSports.com. Retrieved 19 March 2015.
  8. ^ Gittings, Paul (9 December 2014). "Dominique Gisin: Fighter pilot who pursued her golden dream". CNN.com. Retrieved 19 March 2015.

External links[edit]

Awards and achievements
Preceded by
Giulia Steingruber
Swiss Sportswoman of the Year
2014
Succeeded by
Daniela Ryf