Dominique Rocheteau

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
Jump to: navigation, search
Dominique Rocheteau
Dominique Rocheteau.jpg
Personal information
Full name Dominique Rocheteau
Date of birth (1955-01-14) 14 January 1955 (age 62)
Place of birth Saintes, Charente-Maritime, France
Height 1.77 m (5 ft 9 12 in)
Playing position Winger
Youth career
La Rochelle
Etaules
Senior career*
Years Team Apps (Gls)
1972–1980 Saint-Étienne 153 (51)
1980–1987 Paris Saint-Germain 204 (83)
1987–1989 Toulouse 60 (13)
Total 417 (147)
National team
1975–1986 France 49 (15)
Teams managed
2010–2011 Saint-Étienne (president adviser)
2011– Saint-Étienne (sporting director)
* Senior club appearances and goals counted for the domestic league only and correct as of 2016.
‡ National team caps and goals correct as of 2007

Dominique Rocheteau (French pronunciation: ​[dɔminik ʁɔʃəto]; born 14 January 1955 in Saintes, Charente-Maritime) is a former international football winger from France. He played in the final tournament of three World Cups, scoring at least a goal in each of them, and was part of the team that won the European Championship in 1984. At club level, he won 4 Division 1 titles, 3 Coupes de France and played in the 1976 European Champion Clubs' Cup final.

Club career[edit]

Rocheteau began his professional career with AS Saint-Étienne, when they were the most successful and popular football team in France. He was a sinuous and incisive outside right who was nicknamed l'Ange Vert ("The Green Angel"). Injured, he played only the last eight minutes of the 1976 European Champion Clubs' Cup final, which Saint-Étienne lost 1-0 to Bayern Munich. He won three Division 1 titles (1974–1976) and one Coupe de France (1977) with Saint-Étienne. He transferred to Paris Saint-Germain in 1980 with whom he won one Division 1 title (1986) and two Coupes de France (1982–1983). In 1987, he was transferred to Toulouse FC, for whom he played two seasons before retiring in 1989.

Asked in 2012 about his most memorable football moment, Rocheteau cited his 107th-minute decisive goal in the second leg of the 1975-76 European Champion Clubs' Cup quarter-final against FC Dynamo Kyiv. Saint-Étienne had lost the first leg 2-0 but won the second leg 3-0 after extra-time. Dynamo Kyiv were the previous year's winners of the 1974–75 European Cup Winners' Cup.[1]

International career[edit]

With the France national football team, Rocheteau won 49 caps from 1975–1986 and scored 15 goals. He played in final tournament of the 1978 World Cup, 1982 World Cup and 1986 World Cup and was part of the team that won the European Championship in 1984 (though Rocheteau missed the final due to injury). He was injury prone.

Rocheteau played two matches and scored once in Argentina 1978, where France were eliminated in the group stage.[2] Four years later in Spain 1982, he played four matches and scored twice. He started for France in their semi-final defeat against West Germany, and was still on the field for the penalty shooutout, successfully converting his kick.[3] In Mexico 1986, Rocheteau scored only one goal but made four assists;[4] he played four matches, including the quarter-final against Brazil (he was injured and substituted during that match in extra-time and missed the resulting penalty shootout), but did not play in the semi-final against West Germany.

Private and later life[edit]

Rocheteau grew up in Étaules, Charente-Maritime where his grandfather and father ran an oyster farm. The business was later taken over by his brother Antony.[5]

After his retirement, Rocheteau shortly became a sports agent, working for David Ginola and Reynald Pedros. In 2002, he became head of the National Ethics Committee of the French Football Federation. He joined the Saint-Étienne staff in 2010, and has since held various management positions in the club.[6]

Away from football, Rocheteau has been noted for his far left views, and has been associated with the Ligue communiste révolutionnaire and Lutte Ouvrière.[7] In 1995, he played a supporting fictional character in Maurice Pialat's film Le Garçu, starring Gérard Depardieu. He has appeared in a few other movies, TV shows and commercials.[8]

Honours[edit]

Club[edit]

AS Saint-Étienne
Paris Saint-Germain

International[edit]

France

Career statistics[edit]

Club[edit]

[9]

Club performance League Cup Continental Total
Season Club League Apps Goals Apps Goals Apps Goals Apps Goals
France League Coupe de France Europe Total
1972–73 AS Saint-Étienne Division 1 2 0 - - - - 2 0
1973–74 4 0 2 1 - - 6 1
1974–75 4 0 1 0 - - 5 0
1975–76 22 11 1 0 8 3 31 14
1976–77 27 3 7 0 6 0 40 3
1977–78 26 5 1 0 2 0 29 5
1978–79 37 21 5 0 - - 42 21
1979–80 31 11 6 1 5 0 42 12
1980–81 Paris Saint-Germain Division 1 37 16 3 2 - - 40 18
1981–82 22 10 8 6 - - 30 16
1982–83 26 11 9 3 3 0 38 14
1983–84 30 9 1 0 3 0 34 9
1984–85 31 15 10 2 3 3 44 20
1985–86 35 19 7 1 - - 42 20
1986–87 23 3 2 0 2 0 27 3
1987–88 Toulouse FC Division 1 26 6 4 1 4 2 34 9
1988–89 34 7 2 0 - - 36 7
Total 417 147 69 17 36 9 522 173

International[edit]

France national team
Year Apps Goals
1975 3 0
1976 2 0
1977 4 2
1978 5 1
1979 2 0
1980 2 0
1981 4 1
1982 6 2
1983 6 3
1984 5 1
1985 4 4
1986 6 1
Total 49 15

References[edit]

  1. ^ "Dominique Rocheteau: "On a retrouvé des valeurs"". Le Temps (in French). 7 December 2012. Retrieved 3 March 2016. 
  2. ^ "Dominique Rocheteau » World Cup 1978 Argentina". worldfootball.net. Retrieved 3 March 2016. 
  3. ^ "Dominique Rocheteau » World Cup 1982 Spain". worldfootball.net. Retrieved 3 March 2016. 
  4. ^ "World Cup 1986 Statistics". planetworldcup.com. Retrieved 3 March 2016. 
  5. ^ "Les huîtres Rocheteau, de belles fines de claire, arrivent dans la Loire". Le Progrès (in French). 21 March 2014. Retrieved 3 March 2016. 
  6. ^ "Rocheteau, l'ange vain" (in French). Retrieved 3 March 2016. 
  7. ^ "Archived copy". Archived from the original on 2 December 2006. Retrieved 2007-11-08. 
  8. ^ "L'Ange vert refait surface". Le Parisien (in French). 10 June 2012. Retrieved 3 March 2016. 
  9. ^ "Dominique Rocheteau". National Football Teams. Retrieved 4 July 2014. 

External links[edit]