Don't Hang Up (song)

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"Don't Hang Up"
Single by The Orlons
from the album All the Hits by the Orlons
ReleasedOctober 3, 1962
Format7" single[1]
GenreR&B
Length2:19[2]
LabelCameo-Parkway
Songwriter(s)Dave Appell, Kal Mann
Producer(s)Dave Appell, Kal Mann
The Orlons singles chronology
"The Wah-Watusi"
(1962)
"Don't Hang Up"
(1962)
"South Street"
(1963)

"Don't Hang Up" is a 1962 hit single produced by Cameo-Parkway Records and performed by the American R&B music group The Orlons. The song is also credited under the Ariola Records label. The song was a number-four hit on the Billboard Pop chart and reached number three on its R&B chart. One of the group's biggest songs during their career, the song achieved notoriety again in the 1990s, when it was included in the 1993 family comedy film Dennis the Menace.[3] "Don't Hang Up" remains an icon of the early 1960s era of popular music[4] and was awarded gold disc status for selling over one million copies.[5]

Chart performance[edit]

Chart Position
U.S. R&B[6][7] 3
U.S. Pop[6][7] 4
UK Singles Chart[7] 39

Credits[edit]

  • Written by Dave Appell & Kal Mann
  • Executive producer: Bernie Lowe
  • Lead vocals: Rossetta Hightower
  • Backing vocals: Marlena Davis & Shirley Brickley
  • Support vocals: Steve Caldwell[8]

Bruce Springsteen performance[edit]

On February 2, 2017, Bruce Springsteen and the E Street Band performed the song in Australia in response to a heated phone call between President Donald Trump and the Prime Minister of Australia. "We stand before you embarrassed Americans tonight. This is a song from 1965 by The Orlons. We're going to use this to send a letter back home" Springsteen said as he introduced the song.[9]

References[edit]

  1. ^ "THE ORLONS - DON'T HANG UP (SONG)". australian-charts.com. Retrieved 2009-06-10.
  2. ^ "The Best of the Orlons Cameo Parkway 1961-1966". Allmusic. Retrieved 2009-06-10.
  3. ^ "Dennis the Menace credits". Yahoo! Movies. Retrieved 2009-06-10.
  4. ^ "The Orlons Page". Retrieved 2009-06-10.
  5. ^ Murrells, Joseph (1978). The Book of Golden Discs (2nd ed.). London: Barrie and Jenkins. pp. 149 & 164. ISBN 0-214-20512-6.
  6. ^ a b "The Orlons at History of Rock". Retrieved 2009-06-10.
  7. ^ a b c "The Orlons Bio & History". Retrieved 2009-06-10.
  8. ^ "The Best of the Orlons (1961-1966)". Discogs. Retrieved 2009-06-10.
  9. ^ https://www.mirror.co.uk/news/world-news/donald-trump-australian-prime-minister-9743181