Don't Think... Feel

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
Jump to: navigation, search
"Don't Think... Feel"
Don't Think... Feel (Neil Diamond song).jpg
Single by Neil Diamond
Released 1976
Songwriter(s) Neil Diamond

"Don't Think... Feel" is a 1976 song by Neil Diamond from the album Beautiful Noise. It was released as a single in October 1976 and reached #43 in the US Hit Parade. The B-side was "Home is a Wounded Heart".[1]

The "Caribbean-flavored track" features Dr. John on Hammond organ and Jerome Richardson on flute.[2] The song was a take on hippie philosophy with the words "Don't think, feel. Ain't no big deal. Make it real. And don't think, feel."[3]

The title and message of the song attracted comment both positive and negative.[4][5]

References[edit]

  1. ^ Jackson, Laura (2005). Neil Diamond: His Life, His Music, His Passion. ECW Press. p. 145. ISBN 1550227076. Retrieved February 13, 2014. 
  2. ^ Rich Wiseman Neil Diamond: Solitary Star 1988 p.208 "tracks, from the Dixielandish “Stargazer,” to the bluesy “Lady-Oh,” to the Caribbean-flavored “Don't Think . . . Feel” ... Helping to give each track its own identity were a collection of special musical performances, among them Jerome Richardson's dancing flute on “Don't Think . . . Feel,”"
  3. ^ Hanley Norins The Young & Rubicam traveling creative workshop 1990 p.47 "Songwriter Neil Diamond summed up the Hippie philosophy with the words of his popular song, "Don't think, feel. Ain't no big deal. Make it real. And don't think, feel." But the Hippies did not bother to have a focus, and we have a practical job ...
  4. ^ Karl Albrecht -Brain Power: Learn to Improve Your Thinking Skills 2009 p.10 "Popular singer Neil Diamond recorded a rock song titled “Don't Think—Feel!” "
  5. ^ George Aiken Taylor The Presbyterian Journal 1977 -- Volume 36 p. 126 "The album [sic], "....Don't Think, Feel," by popular singer Neil Diamond stayed at the top of charts for weeks. In the evangelical and even Reformed community, this influence has resulted in a tendency to disregard the rational element of the Gospel;"