Don Brodie

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Don Brodie
Donbrodie.jpg
Brodie in Second Chorus, 1940
Born(1904-05-29)May 29, 1904
DiedJanuary 8, 2001(2001-01-08) (aged 96)
OccupationFilm, television actor
Years active(before) 1928–1989

Don Brodie (May 29, 1904, Cincinnati, Ohio – January 8, 2001, Los Angeles, California) was an American actor and director.

Early years[edit]

The son of Mrs. Lottie Brodie,[1] he attended Hughes High School in Cincinnati and the University of Cincinnati.[2] Before becoming a professional actor, he worked in Procter & Gamble's main offices.[1]

Career[edit]

As early as 1928, Brodie was acting on stage. A review in The Cincinnati Enquirer listed him in the cast of the Civic Theater's production of The Pigeon.[3]

Brodie worked with Cincinnati's Civic Repertory Theater for nine years.[2]

A veteran of more than 250 film and television productions, Brodie signed his first film contract with Universal Pictures Corporation in 1931.[2]

He appeared as a callow, mustachioed actor in a variety of utility roles in films from the early 1930s. Usually playing bit parts in features, his more notable credits include his voiceover work in the Disney cartoon features Pinocchio and Dumbo and his portrayal of a careful used car lot owner in the film noir classic Detour. He also worked off and on as a dialogue director.

In 1944, he directed his sole movie, A Fig Leaf for Eve.

Brodie's final appearance in a film came in Goodnight, Sweet Marilyn (1989).

Death[edit]

On January 8, 2001, Brodie died in Los Angeles, California. His entry in the reference work Obituaries in the Performing Arts, 2001: Film, Television, Radio, Theatre, Dance, Music, Cartoons and Pop Culture gave his age as 101 and his birth date as May 29, 1899.[4]

Filmography[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b "Movie Actor On Way For Visit In Norwood". The Cincinnati Enquirer. Ohio, Cincinnati. 11 June 1935. p. 9. Retrieved January 4, 2018 – via Newspapers.com. open access publication – free to read
  2. ^ a b c "Don Brodie Signs". The Cincinnati Enquirer. Ohio, Cincinnati. 17 May 1931. p. Section 3 - Page 4. Retrieved January 4, 2018 – via Newspapers.com. open access publication – free to read
  3. ^ "Civic Theater". The Cincinnati Enquirer. Ohio, Cincinnati. 26 April 1928. p. 4. Retrieved January 4, 2018 – via Newspapers.com. open access publication – free to read
  4. ^ Lentz, Harris M. (2002). Obituaries in the Performing Arts, 2001: Film, Television, Radio, Theatre, Dance, Music, Cartoons and Pop Culture. McFarland. pp. 45–46. ISBN 9780786412785. Retrieved 4 January 2018.

External links[edit]