Don Shanks (footballer)

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Don Shanks
Personal information
Date of birth (1952-10-02) 2 October 1952 (age 65)
Place of birth Hammersmith, England
Playing position Full back
Youth career
Fulham
Senior career*
Years Team Apps (Gls)
1970–1974 Luton Town 90 (2)
1974–1981 Queens Park Rangers 180 (10)
1981–1983 Brighton & Hove Albion 46 (0)
1984 Wimbledon 1 (0)
Wealdstone
* Senior club appearances and goals counted for the domestic league only.

Don Shanks (born 2 October 1952) is an English former professional footballer born in Hammersmith, London, who played in the Football League as a full back[1] for Luton Town,[2] Queens Park Rangers,[3] Brighton & Hove Albion[4] and Wimbledon, before moving into non-league football with Wealdstone.[5]

Shanks began his football career as a junior at Fulham, but moved on to Luton Town without appearing in Fulham's first team.[2] He joined QPR in November 1974 and made his debut against Burnley in December 1974. He eventually played 180 league games for QPR, scoring 10 times, before transferring to Brighton in 1981,[1] and playing one game on a non-contract basis for Wimbledon.[5]

He is also known for being Stan Bowles' gambling partner[6] and for dating Mary Stavin, the 1977 Miss World.[7]

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b "Don Shanks – Queens Park Rangers FC". Football Heroes. Sporting Heroes Collections Ltd. Retrieved 2009-07-30. 
  2. ^ a b "Luton Town : 1946/47 – 2007/08". UK A–Z Transfers. Neil Brown. Retrieved 2009-07-30. 
  3. ^ "Queens Park Rangers : 1946/47 – 2007/08". UK A–Z Transfers. Neil Brown. Archived from the original on 19 December 2013. Retrieved 2009-07-30. 
  4. ^ "Brighton & Hove Albion : 1946/47 – 2007/08". UK A–Z Transfers. Neil Brown. Retrieved 2009-07-30. 
  5. ^ a b "Milton Keynes Dons : 1977/78 – 2007/08 (formerly known as Wimbledon)". UK A–Z Transfers. Neil Brown. Retrieved 2009-07-30. 
  6. ^ Baker, Danny (25 January 2003). "Owen follows in fine tradition of Stan the Man". The Times. Retrieved 2009-07-30. 
  7. ^ Pattullo, Alan (3 December 2005). "A bigger legend than the Stone of Scone". The Scotsman. Retrieved 2009-07-30.