Don Tricker

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Don Tricker is a former player and coach of the New Zealand national softball team (Black Socks) and senior advisor of high performance coaching at the New Zealand Academy of Sport.

Career[edit]

Tricker's grandfather was one of the country's leading softball umpires and played a key role in introducing the game to the Wellington region.[1] Tricker played for Porirua until he was 22 then moved to Poneke Kilbirnie, claiming regional and national titles with both clubs,[1] and played for the Black Socks on and off between 1986 and 1991.[2] He began his coaching career at Poneke Kilbirnie in 1996, while he was still playing, and was named Black Sock coach two years later.[1] He coached the team to two world championship wins in 2000 and three consecutive world titles.[3] He was named coach of the year at the Halberg Awards in 2000 after leading the team to a world series victory in South Africa[4] and was made an officer of the New Zealand Order of Merit in 2004.[5] He retired as national coach in 2004, being replaced by Eddie Kohlhase.[6] In 2002, after 6 years in the information technology sector, Tricker was appointed as senior advisor of high performance coaching at the New Zealand Academy of Sport, a unit of Sport and Recreation New Zealand.[4] Tricker and Auckland lawyer Mike Heron prepared a report into the All Blacks early World Cup exit.[7] In 2010 the New Zealand Rugby Union has appointed Tricker as the High Performance Manager.[8]

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b c Julie Ash (Oct 27, 2001). "Softball: Seriously good coach shares the funny side". New Zealand Herald. 
  2. ^ Julie Ash (Jul 16, 2004). "Softball: Tricker picks his successor". New Zealand Herald. 
  3. ^ "Our top ten sports stars". New Zealand Herald. Dec 18, 2004. 
  4. ^ a b "Softball: Tricker appointed to Academy of Sport". New Zealand Herald. Feb 11, 2002. 
  5. ^ Julie Ash (Jun 7, 2004). "Queen's Birthday Honours: Softballers and cricketers recognised for exploits". New Zealand Herald. 
  6. ^ "Black Sox reappoint coach". New Zealand Herald. Dec 1, 2009. 
  7. ^ Mike Houlahan (Apr 18, 2008). "We're sorry, NZRU chairman tells fans". New Zealand Herald. 
  8. ^ "Softball man gets All Black job". Rugby Rugby. September 2010. Archived from the original on 15 July 2011. Retrieved 20 February 2011.