Donald Bailey (musician)

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Donald Bailey
Birth nameDonald Orlando Bailey, Sr.
Born(1933-03-26)March 26, 1933
Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, U.S.
DiedOctober 15, 2013(2013-10-15) (aged 80)
Montclair, California
GenresJazz
Occupation(s)Musician
InstrumentsDrums
LabelsBlue Note
Associated actsJimmy Smith
Hampton Hawes
Blue Mitchell
Carmen McRae
Sarah Vaughan

Donald Orlando "Duck" Bailey (March 26, 1933 – October 15, 2013) was an American jazz drummer.[1][2]

Biography[edit]

Bailey was born in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, on March 26, 1933.[3] He was largely self-taught as a drummer.[3]

Bailey got his big break in the jazz world and he is probably best known as the drummer in the trio of jazz organist Jimmy Smith from 1956 to 1964 and also for his work with The Three Sounds on Blue Note Records.[4] While based in Los Angeles, Bailey also worked as a sideman for musicians including Sarah Vaughan, Carmen McRae, Hampton Hawes, Kenny Burrell, and Red Mitchell.[5] In the mid-1970s, Bailey moved to Japan, where he lived for five years.[6]

His album Blueprints of Jazz, Vol. 3 featured Charles Tolliver (trumpet), Odean Pope (tenor saxophone) and George Burton (piano) and was issued by Talking House Records in 2008.[7] His playing also featured on the soundtracks of the films Buck and the Preacher[8] and Twin Peaks: Fire Walk With Me.[9]

Bailey performed around the San Francisco Bay Area[10] until his late seventies and moved to Montclair, California, shortly before his death at age 80 in October 2013. He had suffered from asthma, seizures, and back problems.[11][12]

Discography[edit]

As leader[edit]

  • Trio (Capri, 1990)
  • Blueprints of Jazz (Talking House, 2006)

As sideman[edit]

With Roy Ayers

With George Braith

With Hampton Hawes

With Harold Land

With Thornel Schwartz

With Jimmy Smith

With The Three Sounds

With Frank Wess and Johnny Coles

With Jack Wilson

References[edit]

  1. ^ "LC Linked Data Service: Authorities and Vocabularies (Library of Congress)". Id.loc.gov. Retrieved October 21, 2019. CS1 maint: discouraged parameter (link)
  2. ^ Tamarkin, Jeff. "Drummer Donald "Duck" Bailey Dies at 80". Jazztimes.com. Retrieved October 21, 2019. CS1 maint: discouraged parameter (link)
  3. ^ a b Williams, J. Kent (2003), Bailey, Donald (Orlando, Sr.) [Donald 'Duck'], Grove Music Online. Oxford Music Online. Oxford University Press, doi:10.1093/gmo/9781561592630.article.J021800
  4. ^ "Donald Bailey Biography". All About Jazz. Archived from the original on October 22, 2012. Retrieved September 23, 2012. CS1 maint: discouraged parameter (link)
  5. ^ "Obituary: Drummer Donald "Duck" Bailey, 1934-2013". JazzWest.com. Archived from the original on October 29, 2013. Retrieved January 11, 2020. CS1 maint: discouraged parameter (link)
  6. ^ Brady, Shaun (March 2009). "Donald Bailey: Philly Soul". JazzTimes. Archived from the original on December 2, 2016. CS1 maint: discouraged parameter (link)
  7. ^ Wilkins, Woodrow (November 14, 2008). "Mike Clark, Billy Harper, Donald Bailey: Blueprints Of Jazz (Blueprints of Jazz Vol. 3)". AllAboutJazz.com. Retrieved January 11, 2020. CS1 maint: discouraged parameter (link)
  8. ^ Buck and the Preacher Library of Congress soundtrack credit
  9. ^ Twin Peaks Fire Walk With Me Library of Congress soundtrack credit)
  10. ^ Yanow, Scott. "Donald Bailey Biography". AllMusic. Retrieved September 23, 2012. CS1 maint: discouraged parameter (link)
  11. ^ "Drummerworld: Donald Bailey". Archived from the original on October 30, 2013. Retrieved October 17, 2013.
  12. ^ Harrington, Jim (November 3, 2009). "Jazzman Donald Bailey overcomes adversity". Mercury News.

Further reading[edit]