Donald F. Hunt

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Donald F. Hunt is the University Professor of Chemistry and Pathology at the University of Virginia.[1]

Early life and education[edit]

He received his B.S. and Ph.D. from the University of Massachusetts Amherst and was a National Institutes of Health Postdoctoral trainee under Professor Klaus Biemann at MIT. [2]

The Hunt laboratory[edit]

The Hunt laboratory develops new methodology and instrumentation centered on mass spectrometry based proteomics for the characterization of proteins and their modifications.

Research interests[edit]

Among his many research interests, Prof. Hunt investigates how the immune system uses peptides to kill diseased cells, and how modifications to chromatin-associated proteins called histones create a "Code" that may be involved in many gene regulation events.

Professor Hunt teaches Organic Chemistry lab at the University of Virginia.

Awards[edit]

Widely regarded in the proteomic community, Prof. Hunt has been awarded several honors including the Distinguished Contribution Award from the American Society for Mass Spectrometry; the Christian B. Anfinsen Award from the Protein Society; the Chemical Instrumentation Award and Field and Franklin Award from the American Chemical Society; the Thomson Medal from the International Mass Spectrometry Society; the Human Proteome Organization's Distinguished Achievement Award in Proteomics, and the Association of Biomolecular Resource Facilities 2007 Award.

References[edit]