Donald James Porter

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Donald James Porter (March 24, 1921 – February 17, 2003) was a United States federal judge.

Early life and education[edit]

Born in Madison, South Dakota, Porter received a B.S. from the University of South Dakota in 1942 and an LL.B. from the University of South Dakota School of Law in 1943. He was in the United States Army during World War II, from 1943 to 1946.

Career[edit]

He was staff attorney of the Office of Temporary Controls, in Sioux Falls, South Dakota, in 1946. He was also staff attorney of the Office of Temporary Controls, in St. Paul, Minnesota, in 1947.

He was in private practice, in Chamberlain, South Dakota, from 1947 to 1959. He was a state's attorney of Brule County, South Dakota, from 1948 to 1952. He served as a South Dakota state representative, from 1955 to 1957. He was a state's attorney of Brule County, South Dakota, from 1957 to 1959. He was in private practice in Pierre, South Dakota, from 1959 to 1977. He was an associate justice, South Dakota Supreme Court, from 1977 to 1979.

Porter was a federal judge on the United States District Court for the District of South Dakota. He was nominated by President Jimmy Carter, on March 15, 1979, to a new seat created by 92 Stat. 1629. He was confirmed by the United States Senate, on May 10, 1979, and received his commission on May 11, 1979. He served as chief judge from 1985-1991. He assumed senior status on March 16, 1992. Porter served in that capacity until his death.

Sources[edit]

Legal offices
Preceded by
new seat
Judge of the United States District Court for the District of South Dakota
1979–1992
Succeeded by
Lawrence L. Piersol