Donald MacCrimmon MacKay

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Donald MacCrimmon MacKay
Born (1922-08-09)9 August 1922
Died 6 February 1987(1987-02-06) (aged 64)
Institutions Keele University
Alma mater St Andrews University
King's College London
Spouse Valerie Wood
Children Robert Sinclair MacKay
David J. C. MacKay

Donald MacCrimmon MacKay (9 August 1922 – 6 February 1987) was a British physicist, and professor at the Department of Communication and Neuroscience at Keele University in Staffordshire, England, known for his contributions to information theory and the theory of brain organisation.[1]

Education[edit]

MacKay was educated at Wick High School and St Andrews University, and gained a PhD at King's College London.[2] In the late 1940s MacKay was among the first members of the Ratio Club.

Personal life[edit]

Married to Valerie Wood, they had five children. His oldest son is Robert Sinclair MacKay, a professor of mathematics at the University of Warwick; his youngest son was David J. C. MacKay, a professor of physics at the University of Cambridge. He died within a year of giving the 1986 Gifford Lectures at the University of Glasgow.

Quotes[edit]

In our age, when people look for explanations, the tendency more and more is to conceive of any and every situation that we are trying to understand by analogy with a machine.[3]

Selected Publications[edit]

MacKay authored and authored several publications. A selection:

About MacKay

See also[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ Donald MacCrimmon MacKay Gifford Lectures bio
  2. ^ MacKay, D. M. (1951). The application of electronic principles to the solution of differential equations in physics. (Thesis). University of London (King's College). Maughan Library: Index to theses, 2-2818. Barcode 0202950465. 
  3. ^ Cited in: Sytse Strijbos (1988) Het Technische Wereldbeeld. p. 13.