Donald Maclean (judge)

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
Jump to: navigation, search
For other people named Donald Maclean, see Donald Maclean (disambiguation).
Donald Maclean
Born 1877
Fourchu, Nova Scotia[1]
Died July 1947

Donald Maclean (1877 – July 1947) was a Canadian politician, judge, and university administrator. Between 1918 and 1921, he was in His Majesty's Loyal Opposition in Saskatchewan. In April 1921, he became a Saskatchewan judge and accepted an appointment to the Justice of the Court of King's Bench. He taught in the faculty of law, at the University of Saskatchewan until 1923.[2] An honorary Doctor of Civil Law was bestowed upon him May 9, 1947 for services rendered to the public especially within the University of Saskatchewan.[3] Donald Maclean held a term of office on the University of Saskatchewan Board of Governors from 1932-1946.[4] Donald Maclean was the fourth Chancellor of the University of Saskatchewan and served in this position from 1946 until his death in 1947.[5]

Early life[edit]

He was born in Fourchu, Richmond County, Nova Scotia, the son of Neil MacLean and Euphemia MacDonald, and was educated at the Pictou Academy and Dalhousie University. In 1909, MacLean moved to Saskatchewan.[1]

Political career[edit]

In the wartime Saskatchewan general election held June 26, 1917, Donald Maclean was elected to the Saskatoon City seat. William Melville Martin of the Liberal Party of Saskatchewan became premier of the province. Wellington Bartley Willoughby was leader of the Conservative Party at the time of the election, however, he stepped down when offered an appointment to the Senate of Canada. From 1918 through 1921, Donald Maclean was elected leader of the Conservative Party and His Majesty's Loyal Opposition. During his time in office, the School Act was amended to choose the English Language as the language of instruction in Saskatchewan's one room schoolhouses.[6] The next Saskatchewan election was held June 9, 1921. However, Donald Maclean had accepted an appointment to the bench in April 1921, and left politics. James Thomas Milton Anderson was elected leader of the Conservative Party in 1924. The Conservative Party was split into Independent Conservatives and fractured groups and remained without a leader for three years.

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b Marble, Allan Everett (1977). Nova Scotians at home and abroad: biographical sketches of over six hundred native born Nova Scotians. Lancelot Press. p. 284. Retrieved 2012-03-18. 
  2. ^ University of Saskatchewan Archives (May 23, 2005), Chancellors - Donald Maclean :: University of Saskatchewan Archives, retrieved 2007-09-09 
  3. ^ University of Saskatchewan Archives (April 20, 2007), Honorary degree recipients :: University of Saskatchewan Archives, retrieved 2007-09-09 
  4. ^ University of Saskatchewan Archives (July 10, 2006), Members of the Board of Governors :: University of Saskatchewan Archives, retrieved Sep 8, 2007 
  5. ^ University of Saskatchewan Archives (May 23, 2005), Chancellors - Donald Maclean :: University of Saskatchewan Archives, retrieved Sep 8, 2007 
  6. ^ Kyba, Patrick; Canadian Plains Reseearch Center, University of Regina (2006), "MacLean, Donald (1877–1947)", The Encyclopedia of Saskatchewan, retrieved 2007-09-09 
Academic offices
Preceded by
P. E. MacKenzie
Chancellor of the University of Saskatchewan
1946–1947
Succeeded by
F. H. Auld
Preceded by
P. E. MacKenzie
Members of the Board of Governors of the University of Saskatchewan
by appointment date

1932–1946
Succeeded by
A. W. Argue
Party political offices
Preceded by
Wellington Bartley Willoughby
Leader of the Conservative Party of Saskatchewan
1918–1921
Succeeded by
James Thomas Milton Anderson