Donald R. Norland

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
Jump to: navigation, search
Donald R. Norland
10th United States Ambassador to Chad
In office
November 17, 1979 – March 24, 1980
President Jimmy Carter
Preceded by William G. Bradford
Succeeded by Jay P. Moffat
3rd United States Ambassador to Botswana
In office
February 23, 1978 – September 8, 1979
President Jimmy Carter
Preceded by David B. Bolen
Succeeded by Horace Dawson
3rd United States Ambassador to Swaziland
In office
February 23, 1978 – September 8, 1979
President Jimmy Carter
Preceded by David B. Bolen
Succeeded by Richard Cavins Matheron
3rd United States Ambassador to Lesotho
In office
February 23, 1978 – September 8, 1979
President Jimmy Carter
Preceded by David B. Bolen
Succeeded by John R. Clingerman
Personal details
Born (1924-06-14)June 14, 1924[1]
Laurens, Iowa
Died December 30, 2007(2007-12-30) (aged 83)
Washington, D.C.
Profession Diplomat

Donald Richard Norland (June 14, 1924 – December 30, 2007) was an American diplomat. He was the United States Ambassador to Botswana, Swaziland, Lesotho, and Chad.[2][3]

Biography[edit]

Donald Roland was born in Laurens, Iowa, and grew up on a family farm. His father was an educator and state legislator. He attended the University of Northern Iowa and joined the United States Navy during World War II. He served on patrol torpedo boats and minesweepers in the Pacific Ocean. After the war, he graduated from the University of Minnesota, with a master's degree in political science in 1950. He joined the U.S. Foreign Service in 1952 and began his career as a cultural affairs officer at the U.S. Embassy in Rabat, Morocco. He was chargé d'affaires to the newly independent nations of Niger, Dahomey (now Benin) and Upper Volta (now Burkina Faso) while consul general in Ivory Coast (now Côte d'Ivoire) in 1960. He served in the early 1960s as a political officer at the NATO headquarters, then in Paris, France. He was a political counselor in the Hague, Netherlands, from 1964 to 1969. He was later deputy chief of mission and chargé d'affaires in Conakry, Guinea.[4]

From 1976 to 1979, Norland served simultaneously as the United States Ambassador to Botswana, Lesotho and Swaziland, while resident at Gaborone.[5] On November 17, 1979, Norland became the United States Ambassador to Chad. During the Libyan backed Chadian Civil War (1979-1982), N'Djamena was captured by the Transitional Government of National Unity, and diplomacy stopped. Norland and other diplomats were evacuated by French military forces to Cameroon in the summer of 1980, and Norland's ambassadorship had essentially ended. Norland retired from the foreign service in 1981, but he continued to lend his expertise on energy and telecommunications projects in Sudan, Nigeria and Chad. He worked with the Harvard Institute for International Development and the U.S. Chamber of Commerce to help economic development. From 1987 to 1989, he headed the training program on African studies at the State Department's Foreign Service Institute.[6]

References[edit]

  1. ^ Public Papers of the Presidents of the United States, Jimmy Carter, 1979, Book 2. Government Printing Office. September 14, 1979. p. 1677. 
  2. ^ "Office of the Historian - Department History - People - Donald Richard Norland". History.state.gov. Retrieved 2011-12-11. 
  3. ^ Lawrence Kestenbaum. "Index to Politicians: Noone to Norrine". The Political Graveyard. Retrieved 2011-12-11. 
  4. ^ http://www.adst.org/OH%20TOCs/Norland,%20Donald.toc.pdf
  5. ^ Stewart Grant. "Botswana_Gaborone_V3.3". Msg-history.com. Retrieved 2011-12-11. 
  6. ^ "Donald Norland; Career Diplomat And Specialist in African Affairs". Washingtonpost.com. 2007-01-05. Retrieved 2011-12-11. 

External links[edit]

Diplomatic posts
Preceded by
Dave Bolen
United States Ambassador to Botswana
1976–1979
Succeeded by
Horace Dawson
Preceded by
William G. Bradford
United States Ambassador to Chad
1979–1980
Succeeded by
embassy closed

 This article incorporates public domain material from the United States Department of State website http://www.state.gov/r/pa/ei/bgn/index.htm (Background Notes).