Donald Weilerstein

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Donald Weilerstein
Born1940 (age 81–82)
Spouse(s)Vivian Hornik Weilerstein
ChildrenAlisa Weilerstein
Academic background
EducationJuilliard School (BM, MM)
Academic work
DisciplineMusic
Sub-disciplineViolin performance
InstitutionsJuilliard School
New England Conservatory of Music

Donald Weilerstein (born 1940) is an American violinist and pedagogue.

Early life and education[edit]

Weilderstein was born in Washington, D.C. and raised in Berkeley, California. He began playing the violin at the age of four and earned a Bachelor of Music and Master of Music from the Juilliard School.[1]

Career[edit]

In 1969, he founded the Cleveland Quartet, becoming its first violinist, a position he held until 1989.[2][3] Since 2004, he has been the Dorothy Richard Starling Chair in Violin Studies at New England Conservatory of Music and since 2001, he is a faculty member at the Juilliard School.[4] His students have won first prize in the Yehudi Menuhin International Competition for Young Violinists and first prize in the International Violin Competition of Indianapolis.[5][6] In addition, he is a member of the Weilerstein Trio with his daughter, Alisa Weilerstein, and wife, Vivian Hornik Weilerstein. Weilerstein is a fellow of the Music Academy of the West.[7]

References[edit]

  1. ^ "Donald and Vivian Weilerstein". The Juilliard School. 2015-11-19. Retrieved 2022-07-03.
  2. ^ "Don Weilerstein, Violin 1969-1989". Cleveland Quartet Website. Archived from the original on 2014-06-23.
  3. ^ Kozinn, Allan (1978-08-06). "Four 'Clevelanders' Who Adopted Beethoven". The New York Times. ISSN 0362-4331. Retrieved 2022-07-03.
  4. ^ "Donald Weilerstein". necmusic.edu. Retrieved 2022-07-03.
  5. ^ "Violinists Xiang Yu and Kerson Leong triumph at Menuhin Competition". Archived from the original on 2014-07-14. Retrieved 2014-06-23.
  6. ^ "1998 Laureates". International Violin Competition of Indianapolis.
  7. ^ "Alumni Roster". musicacademy.org. Archived from the original on 5 June 2012. Retrieved 19 January 2020.