Donald White (basketball)

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Donald White
Personal information
Born(1898-04-22)April 22, 1898
Lebanon, Indiana, US
DiedJuly 12, 1983(1983-07-12) (aged 85)
Kosciusko County, Indiana, US
NationalityAmerican
Career information
High schoolLebanon (Lebanon, Indiana)
CollegePurdue (1918–1921)
PositionGuard
Career history
As coach:
1923–1935Washington University
1936–1945Connecticut
1945–1956,
1962–1963
Rutgers
1956Thailand national team
Career highlights and awards
As player:

As coach:

  • MVC champion (1929–1931)
  • NEC champion (1941)
  • Middle Three champion (1949–1951)

Donald S. White (April 22, 1898 – July 12, 1983)[1] was an American college basketball player and coach. Raised in Lebanon, Indiana, White was a standout basketball player at Lebanon High School and led them to consecutive state championships in 1917 and 1918. He attended Purdue University and played for their basketball and baseball teams.[2][3] As a senior in 1920–21, White led the Western Conference (now known as the Big Ten Conference) in scoring and his Boilermakers to a conference championship. He was named first-team all-Western Conference and was also declared a consensus All-American by the Helms Athletic Foundation.[4]

White became a head coach after his playing days. He served as head coach at Washington University in St. Louis, the University of Connecticut, and Rutgers University.[5][6] He won or tied seven conference regular season championships throughout his career: three at Washington University, one at Connecticut, and three at Rutgers.[5] White compiled an overall career record of 301–332.[5]

Internationally, White was chosen by the U.S. State Department to establish a basketball program in Thailand.[7] He was the national basketball team head coach in the 1956 Summer Olympics,[7] placing 15th out of 15 squads.

Head coaching record[edit]

Season Team Overall Conference Standing Postseason
Washington University Bears (Missouri Valley Conference) (1923–1935)
1923–24 Washington University 10–9 8–8 4th
1924–25 Washington University 10–8 10–6 3rd
1925–26 Washington University 7–9 7–9 6th
1926–27 Washington University 5–10 2–8 9th
1927–28 Washington University 10–12 8–10 5th
1928–29 Washington University 11–7 7–0 1st
1929–30 Washington University 8–8 6–2 1st
1930–31 Washington University 6–12 5–3 1st
1931–32 Washington University 10–9 3–5 3rd
1932–33 Washington University 11–6 5–5 3rd
1933–34 Washington University 7–11 4–6 4th
1934–35 Washington University 7–11 6–6 4th
Washington University: 102–112 (.477) 71–68 (.511)
Connecticut Huskies (Independent) (1936–1937)
1936–37 Connecticut 11–7
Connecticut Huskies (New England Conference) (1937–1943)
1937–38 Connecticut 13–5 4–4 2nd
1938–39 Connecticut 12–6 6–2 2nd
1939–40 Connecticut 9–7 6–2 2nd
1940–41 Connecticut 14–2 7–1 1st
1941–42 Connecticut 12–5 6–2 2nd
1942–43 Connecticut 8–7 5–3 2nd
Connecticut Huskies (Independent) (1943–1945)
1943–44 Connecticut 10–9
1944–45 Connecticut 5–11
Connecticut: 94–59 (.614) 34–14 (.708)
Rutgers Scarlet Knights (Independent) (1945–1948)
1945–46 Rutgers 13–7
1946–47 Rutgers 7–12
1947–48 Rutgers 14–9
Rutgers Scarlet Knights (Middle Three Conference) (1948–1952)
1948–49 Rutgers 14–12 3–1 1st
1949–50 Rutgers 13–15 3–1 1st
1950–51 Rutgers 7–14 3–1 1st
1951–52 Rutgers 6–13 1–2 2nd
Rutgers Scarlet Knights (Independent) (1952–1956)
1952–53 Rutgers 8–13
1953–54 Rutgers 11–13
1954–55 Rutgers 2–22
1955–56 Rutgers 3–15
Rutgers Scarlet Knights (Independent) (1962–1963)
1962–63 Rutgers 7–16
Rutgers: 105–161 (.395) 10–5 (.667)


Total: 301–332 (.476)

      National champion         Postseason invitational champion  
      Conference regular season champion         Conference regular season and conference tournament champion
      Division regular season champion       Division regular season and conference tournament champion
      Conference tournament champion

References[edit]

  1. ^ "DONALD WHITE (1898–1983)". Mocavo. Social Security Death Index. Retrieved February 18, 2015.
  2. ^ "Men's Basketball All-Americans". PurdueSports.com. Purdue University. Retrieved February 18, 2015.
  3. ^ Oshman, Jackie (2014). "2014 Purdue Baseball Media Guide" (PDF). Letterwinners. Retrieved February 18, 2015.
  4. ^ "NCAA All-Americans". apbr.org. Association for Professional Basketball Research. 1999. Retrieved February 18, 2015.
  5. ^ a b c "Donald White Coaching Record". sports-reference.com. Sports Reference LLC. 2014. Retrieved February 18, 2015.
  6. ^ "2014–15 Washington University Men's Basketball Media Guide" (PDF). Yearly records. Washington University in St. Louis. 2014. Retrieved February 18, 2015.
  7. ^ a b "Donald White". Indiana Basketball Hall of Fame. Retrieved February 18, 2015.