Donny Parenteau

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Donny Parenteau
BornPrince Albert, Saskatchewan
GenresCountry, Western swing[1]
Occupation(s)Musician, singer-songwriter, record producer
InstrumentsFiddle, acoustic guitar, electric guitar, mandolin, electric mandolin, double neck guitar and mandocaster[1]
Years active1991–present
LabelsIndependent, 306 Records/EMI Music Canada
Associated actsNeal McCoy, Brad Johner, Sierra Noble
WebsiteDonnyParenteau.com

Donny Parenteau (born in Prince Albert, Saskatchewan) is singer-songwriter, multi-instrumentalist, and record producer. He is best for known his solo career and his work as fiddle player, guitarist, and mandolin player for country music singer Neal McCoy. In February 2011, Parenteau signed with the record label 306 Records/EMI Music Canada to help distribute his albums.[2]

Early life[edit]

At 14, Parenteau took up the fiddle. After mastering the fiddle, he picked up other instruments like the guitar (both acoustic and electric) and the mandolin (both acoustic and electric). Parenteau cites some of his influences as Bryan Sklar,[1] Freddie Pelltier,[1] and George Pistun[1]

Career[edit]

After picking up the violin at a young age, by 19 he was playing professionally.[1] In 1991, Parenteau was playing in Edmonton, Alberta and was invited to a show by Neal McCoy who was also playing in Edmonton.[1] Upon talking with McCoy, Parenteau discovered they had similar taste in music.[1] McCoy was looking for a fiddle player, but didn't have the money to hire one. Parenteau wanted the chance to audition and would not let up until he got the chance to audition. Parenteau listened to the group jamming and had a grasp of what they were playing. It was that song he would use as the audition piece.[1] During his time touring with McCoy, Parenteau got to open for such artists as Merle Haggard,[1] Tim McGraw,[1] Faith Hill,[1] Buck Owens,[1] George Jones,[1] Charlie Pride,[1] Loretta Lynn,[1] Charlie Daniels,[1] Hank Williams, Jr.,[1] Reba McEntire,[1] Garth Brooks,[1] and Shania Twain.[1] Parenteau also graced the Grand Ole Opry stage.[1] Parenteau was the only member of the live band that was also on the recordings.[1] After performing with Neal McCoy for 12 years and playing 250–300 shows a year, Parenteau returned to Prince Albert to embark on a solo career.[1]

Charity work[edit]

Parenteau has done a number of humanitarian and charity work. Evidence of that was winning the 2001 SCMA International Humanitarian Award. Parenteau has also made appearances on Telemiracle starting on the 32nd edition of the telethon. Parenteau co-wrote the current Telemiracle opening theme song with Brad Johner entitled "You are the Miracle". It became the theme in 2011. He also embarks on a tour of elementary schools in Saskatchewan each year as a motivational speaker in which he spreads his message of anti-bullying.

Discography[edit]

Studio albums[edit]

What It Takes

  1. "Country Calling Me
  2. "Old Man Thibodeaux"
  3. "Postmarked Heaven"
  4. "Father Time
  5. "Backyard Swing"
  6. "Someone More Lonesome
  7. "Whatever It Takes
  8. "Cold Virginia Rain"
  9. "Belly Up"
  10. "What She Left Me For"
  11. "Dancing Fool"
  12. "Funky Two Step

To Whom It May Concern (11 January 2011)

  • Label: Phantom
  • Format: CD, digital download

Singles[edit]

  • "Belly Up"
  • "Father Time"
  • "Postmarked Heaven"
  • "I Love Christmas"
  • "Turn It Up"
  • "My Girl"
  • "Watching Over Me"
  • "My Dirt"
  • "To Whom It May Concern"
  • "Can't Afford to Love You"
  • "Sunshower"
  • "Honey It's Broke"

Music videos[edit]

  • "Belly Up"
  • "My Girl"
  • "To Whom It May Concern"
  • "Imagine A World"

Awards and nominations[edit]

Donny Parenteau awards and nominations
Totals[a]
Wins36
Nominations83
  1. ^ Certain award groups do not simply award one winner. They recognize several different recipients, have runners-up and have third place. Since this is a specific recognition and is different from losing an award, runner-up mentions are considered wins in this award tally. Awards in certain categories do not have prior nominations and only winners are announced by the jury. For simplification and to avoid errors, each award in this list has been presumed to have had a prior nomination.

Parenteau has been nominated for a multitude of awards all across Canada picking up a number of them along the way. In 2008, Parenteau was nominated for his country's highest honour by being nominated for a Juno Award.

Year Nominated work Award Category Result Ref
2001 Donny Parenteau Saskatchewan Country Music Awards International Humanitarian Won [3]
2003 Fiddle Saskatchewan Country Music Awards All-Star Band Won [4]
2004 Himself Saskatchewan Country Music Awards[5] Aboriginal Artist of the Year Won [6]
Fiddle All-Star Band Won [6]
2005 "The Great Unknown" Canadian Aboriginal Music Awards[7] Best Producer/Engineer Nominated
Himself Saskatchewan Country Music Awards Aboriginal Artist of the Year Won [8]
Fiddle All-Star Band Won [8]
2006 Himself Saskatchewan Country Music Awards Aboriginal Artist of the Year Won [9]
Fiddle All-Star Band Won [9]
2007 What it Takes Canadian Aboriginal Music Awards Best Album of the Year Nominated
Best Country Album Nominated
"What It Takes" Best Producer/Engineer Won[10]
"Father Time" Best Song Single Won[11]
Best Songwriter Nominated
"Postmarked Heaven" Nominated
Himself Canadian Country Music Awards Chevy Truck Rising Star Nominated [12]
"What It Takes" Saskatchewan Country Music Awards Album of the Year Nominated [13]
Himself Fans' Choice Entertainer of the Year Nominated
Male Vocalist of the Year Nominated
Aboriginal Artist of the Year Won [13]
Record Producer of the Year (with Steve Fox) Won [13]
Fiddle All-Star Band Won [13]
Specialty Won [13]
Donny Parenteau Band Back Up Band Won [13]
"Country Calling Me" Single of the Year Nominated
Song of the Year Nominated
What it Takes Western Canadian Music Awards Outstanding Aboriginal Recording Nominated [14]
Outstanding Country Recording Nominated [14]
2008 Juno Awards Aboriginal Recording of the Year Nominated [15]
Fiddle Canadian Country Music Awards All-Star Band Nominated [16]
Himself Saskatchewan Country Music Awards Aboriginal Artist of the Year Won [17]
Fans' Choice Entertainer of the Year Won [17]
Male Vocalist of the Year Won [17]
Record Producer of the Year Nominated
Fiddle All-Star Band Won [17]
Donny Parenteau Band Back Up Band Won [17]
"Postmarked Heaven" Single of the Year Won [17]
Song of the Year Won [17]
"Father Time" Single of the Year Nominated
Song of the Year Nominated
What It Takes Aboriginal People's Choice Music Awards Best Country CD Nominated
Best Album Cover Design Nominated
2009 Fiddle Canadian Country Music Awards All-Star Band Nominated [18]
Himself Saskatchewan Country Music Awards Aboriginal Artist of the Year Won [19]
2010 Won [20]
2011 Won [21]
Fans' Choice Entertainer of the Year Nominated
Male Vocalist of the Year Nominated
Manager of the Year Nominated
Fiddle All-Star Band Nominated
Specialty Won [21]
"My Girl" Single of the Year Nominated
Song of the Year Nominated
Video of the Year Nominated
Himself Aboriginal People's Choice Awards Aboriginal Male Entertainer of the Year Nominated [22][23]
To Whom It May Concern Best Country CD Nominated [22][23]
Canadian Aboriginal Music Awards Best Album of the Year Nominated
Best Country Album Won [24][25]
Himself Best Songwriter Won [24][25]
Best Male Artist Won [24][25]
Best Producer/Engineer (with Harry Stinson) Won [24][25]
"To Whom It May Concern" Best Song Single Nominated
Best Music Video Won [24][25]
2012 To Whom It May Concern Juno Awards Aboriginal Recording of the Year Nominated [15]
Fiddle Canadian Country Music Awards All-Star Band Nominated [26]
2013 Donny Parenteau Saskatchewan Country Music Awards Aboriginal Artist of the Year Won [27]
Fans' Choice Entertainer of the Year Nominated
Record Producer of the Year Nominated
Country Music Person of the Year Nominated
Bring It On Album of the Year Won [27]
"Sunshower" Song of the Year Nominated
"Can't Afford to Love You" Single of the Year Nominated
Fiddle All-Star Band Won [27]
Specialty Won [27]
Bring It On Juno Awards Aboriginal Recording of the Year Nominated [15]
2014 Fiddle Saskatchewan Country Music Awards All-Star Band Won [28]
2017 Fiddle Nominated [29]
Specialty Nominated [29]

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b c d e f g h i j k l m n o p q r s t u v w x Kelly, Lorena. "Donny Parenteau: Called by Country" (PDF). The Session. Retrieved 13 March 2011.[permanent dead link]
  2. ^ "Donny Parenteau signs with "360 Records/EMI". CashBoxCanada.ca. 18 February 2011. Retrieved 12 March 2011.
  3. ^ "2001 SCMA Award Winners". scma.sk.ca. Saskatchewan Country Music Association. Retrieved 28 November 2015.
  4. ^ "2003 SCMA Awards Winners". scma.sk.ca. Saskatchewan Country Music Association. Retrieved 28 November 2015.
  5. ^ "2004 SCMA Award Winners | Saskatchewan Country Music Association". scma.sk.ca. Retrieved 28 November 2015.
  6. ^ a b "2004 SCMA Award Winners". scma.sk.ca. Saskatchewan Country Music Association. Retrieved 28 November 2015.
  7. ^ "Music Awards- 2005 Category Finalists". Canadian Aboriginal Music Awards. Archived from the original on 15 March 2011. Retrieved 12 March 2011.
  8. ^ a b "2005 SCMA Award Winners". scma.sk.ca. Saskatchewan Country Music Association. Retrieved 28 November 2015.
  9. ^ a b "2006 SCMA Award Winners". scma.sk.ca. Saskatchewan Country Music Association. Retrieved 28 November 2015.
  10. ^ "Best Producer/Engineer". Canadian Aboriginal Music Awards. Archived from the original on 15 March 2011. Retrieved 12 March 2011.
  11. ^ "Best Song Single". Canadian Aboriginal Music Awards. Archived from the original on 15 March 2011. Retrieved 12 March 2011.
  12. ^ "Canadian Country Music Awards Nominees Released". NationTalk.ca. 1 August 2007. Retrieved 12 March 2011.
  13. ^ a b c d e f "2007 SCMA Award Winners". scma.sk.ca. Saskatchewan Country Music Association. Retrieved 28 November 2015.
  14. ^ a b "2007 Awards Winners". Western Canadian Music Alliance, Inc. Archived from the original on 15 March 2011. Retrieved 12 March 2011.
  15. ^ a b c "Artist Summary – Donny Parenteau". Canadian Academy of Recording Arts and Sciences. Retrieved 12 March 2013.
  16. ^ "2008 CCMA Awards Nominees" (PDF). Canadian Country Music Association. 30 July 2008. Archived from the original (PDF) on 26 June 2011. Retrieved March 12, 2011.
  17. ^ a b c d e f g "2008 SCMA Award Winners". scma.sk.ca. Saskatchewan Country Music Association. Retrieved 28 November 2015.
  18. ^ "2009 CCMA Awards Nominees Listing" (Press release). Canadian Country Music Association. 29 July 2009. Archived from the original on 12 November 2013. Retrieved 12 March 2011.
  19. ^ "2009 SCMA Award Winners". scma.sk.ca. Saskatchewan Country Music Association. Retrieved 28 November 2015.
  20. ^ "2010 SCMA Award Winners". scma.sk.ca. Saskatchewan Country Music Association. Retrieved 28 November 2015.
  21. ^ a b "2011 SCMA Winners". scma.sk.ca. Saskatchewan Country Music Association. Retrieved 28 November 2015.
  22. ^ a b "Nominees Announced For 2011 Aboriginal Peoples Choice Music Awards". Manitoba Chamber of Commerce. Retrieved 18 November 2011.
  23. ^ a b 2011 Aboriginal People's Choice Award winners, Aboriginal Peoples Choice Awards, archived from the original on 9 December 2011, retrieved 4 December 2017
  24. ^ a b c d e "2011 Canadian Aboriginal Music Awards Winners". Canadian Aboriginal Music Awards. Retrieved 29 February 2012.
  25. ^ a b c d e "2011 Canadian Aboriginal Music Award Winners". RPM - Revolutions Per Minute. Retrieved 4 December 2017.
  26. ^ "2012 CCMA Award Winners List". TopCountry.ca. 9 September 2012. Retrieved 28 November 2017.
  27. ^ a b c d "2013 SCMA Winners". scma.sk.ca. Saskatchewan Country Music Association. Retrieved 4 December 2017.
  28. ^ "2014 SCMA Award Winners". scma.sk.ca. Saskatchewan Country Music Association. Retrieved 4 December 2017.
  29. ^ a b "2017 SCMA Award Nominees". scma.sk.ca. Saskatchewan Country Music Association. Retrieved 4 December 2017.

External links[edit]