Donovan's solution

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
Jump to: navigation, search
Donovan's Solution
IUPAC name
iodomercury; triiodoarsane
Other names
liquor hydriodatis arsenici et hydrargyri
ChemSpider 29291736 YesY
Jmol interactive 3D Image
PubChem 24679
RTECS number CG3200000
UN number 1557
Molar mass 783.12948
Appearance Clear, colourless, or pale yellow. Darkens with age.
Boiling point 403 °C (757 °F; 676 K) at 760 mmHg
Main hazards Toxic
Except where otherwise noted, data are given for materials in their standard state (at 25 °C [77 °F], 100 kPa).
Infobox references

Donovan's solution is an inorganic compound prepared from arsenic triiodide and mercuric iodine.[1]


1g each of AsI3 and HgI2 with 0.9 sodium bicarbonate in water to make 100 ml.

Cooley's cyclopædia of practical receipts and ... information on the arts, manufactures, and trades gives a more complex method.[2]


Has been used in veterinary medicine to treat chronic diseases of the skin.[3] Also as a folk remedy.[4] Used during the 19th century to treat Lepra vulgaris[5] and psoriasis[6][7] in humans, taken internally.


  1. ^ Budavari, Susan (1989). "3413. Donovan's Solution". The Merck Index (11th ed.). Merck & Co., Inc. p. 537. ISBN 091191028X. LCCN 89060001. 
  2. ^ Arnold James Cooley (1880). "Solution". In Richard Vine Tuson. A cyclopædia of practical receipts and ... information on the arts, manufactures, and trades II (6th ed.). p. 1525. 
  3. ^ Oxtoby, David W.; H.P. Gillis; Allan Campion (2012). Principles of modern chemistry (7th ed.). Belmont, Calif.: Brooks/Cole Cengage Learning. p. 513. ISBN 0840049315. 
  4. ^ "Donovan's solution". Chemical Dictionary Online. Retrieved 29 November 2013. 
  5. ^ Sir Erasmus Wilson (1847). "Treatment of Lepra". On Diseases of the Skin (2nd ed.). John Churchill. p. 271. 
  6. ^ Henry G. Piffard (1881). "Psoriasis Treatment. Part 6". A Treatise On The Materia Medica And Therapeutics Of The Skin. Sampson, Low, Marston, Searle & Rivington. p. 254. 
  7. ^ "GOOD RESULTS OF DONOVAN'S SOLUTION IN PSORIASIS.". The Lancet 70 (1770): 116. August 1857. doi:10.1016/S0140-6736(02)38789-0. 

External links[edit]