Donovan Dela Cruz

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Donovan Dela Cruz[1]
Senator Donovan M. Dela Cruz.jpg
Member of the Hawaii Senate
from the 22nd district
Assumed office
January 19, 2011
Preceded byRobert Bunda
Personal details
Born (1973-07-06) July 6, 1973 (age 45)
Wahiawa, Hawaii
NationalityAmerican
Political partyDemocratic
ResidenceWahiawa, Hawaii
Alma materUniversity of Oregon
Websitedonovandelacruz.com

Donovan M. Dela Cruz[2] (born July 6, 1973 in Wahiawa, Hawaii) is an American politician and a Democratic member of the Hawaii Senate since January 19, 2011 representing District 22.

Education[edit]

Dela Cruz earned his BAs in communications and journalism from the University of Oregon.

Elections[edit]

  • 2012 Dela Cruz and his 2010 Republican opponent Charles Aki were both unopposed for their August 11, 2012 primaries,[3] setting up a rematch; Dela Cruz won the November 6, 2012 General election with 10,393 votes (69.2%) against Aki.[4]
  • 2010 When Democratic Senator Robert Bunda ran for Lieutenant Governor of Hawaii and left the Senate District 22 seat open, Dela Cruz won the four-way September 18, 2010 Democratic Primary with 3,005 votes (37.8%) in a field which included Representative Michael Magaoay,[5] and won the November 2, 2010 General election with 8,738 votes (67.3%) against Republican nominee Charles Aki.[6]

References[edit]

  1. ^ "Senator Donovan M. Dela Cruz". Honolulu, Hawaii: Hawaii State Legislature. Archived from the original on September 30, 2014. Retrieved December 5, 2013.
  2. ^ "Donovan Dela Cruz's Biography". Project Vote Smart. Retrieved December 5, 2013.
  3. ^ "Primary Election 2012 - State of Hawaii - Statewide August 11, 2012" (PDF). Honolulu, Hawaii: Hawaii Office of Elections. p. 2. Retrieved December 5, 2013.
  4. ^ "Hawaii General 2012 - State of Hawaii - Statewide November 6, 2012" (PDF). Honolulu, Hawaii: Hawaii Office of Elections. p. 1. Retrieved December 5, 2013.
  5. ^ "Primary Election 2010 - State of Hawaii - Statewide September 18, 2010" (PDF). Honolulu, Hawaii: Hawaii Office of Elections. p. 2. Retrieved December 5, 2013.
  6. ^ "General Election - State of Hawaii - Statewide November 2, 2010" (PDF). Honolulu, Hawaii: Hawaii Office of Elections. p. 1. Retrieved December 5, 2013.

External links[edit]