Doom loop

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In economics, a doom loop is "a negative spiral that can result when banks hold sovereign bonds and governments bail out banks".[1][2][3][4][5][6][7][8]

References[edit]

  1. ^ Doom Loops and Europe’s Financial System, IGM Forum, May 22, 2019. Accessed August 24, 2019.
  2. ^ Covi, Giovanni; Eydam, Ulrich (19 May 2018). "End of the sovereign-bank doom loop in the European Union? The Bank Recovery and Resolution Directive". Journal of Evolutionary Economics. doi:10.1007/s00191-018-0576-2. Retrieved 25 May 2019.
  3. ^ De Groen, Willem (13 March 2015). "The ECB's QE: Time to Break the Doom Loop between Banks and Their Governments". Papers.ssrn.com. Retrieved 25 May 2019.
  4. ^ Spyros Alogoskoufis; Sam Langfield. "Working Paper Series : No 74 / May 2018 : Regulating the doom loop" (PDF). Esrb.europa.eu. Retrieved 25 May 2019.
  5. ^ Potter, Samuel; Verma, Sid; Sirletti, Sonia. "The Sovereign-Bank `Doom Loop' Won't Let Italian Markets Escape". Bloomberg. Retrieved 25 May 2019.
  6. ^ "Eurozone banks buy sovereign bonds, reviving 'doom loop' fear". Financial Times. Retrieved 25 May 2019.
  7. ^ Chilkoti, Avantika; Kantchev, Georgi (2 October 2018). "Investors Fear Italian 'Doom Loop' as Bond Selloff Deepens". Wsj.com. Retrieved 25 May 2019.
  8. ^ "'Doom loop' link between European banks, sovereigns seen loosening". Reuters.com. 19 May 2017. Retrieved 25 May 2019.