Doran Clark

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Doran Clark
Born (1954-08-08) August 8, 1954 (age 62)
California, U.S.[citation needed]
Residence Hollywood Hills, California, U.S.
Years active 1979–2000
Spouse(s) Peter Abrams
Children 2

Doran Clark (born August 8, 1954) is an American actress.

Early years[edit]

Clark was born to actress/model Audrey Caire and William Clark. She has two sisters and two brothers, including actress Louise Clark Goddard (of the Harry and Louise political commercials). She is the granddaughter of General Mark W. Clark.[1]

Career[edit]

Clark's film and television credits include Black Eagle (with Jean-Claude Van Damme), Passport to Paris (with Mary-Kate and Ashley Olsen), numerous appearances on Perry Mason, Matlock, Jake and the Fatman, Trapper John, M.D., an appearance on an episode of MacGyver called "The Heist," several episodes of Murder, She Wrote, as well as many starring and supporting roles on sitcoms from the late 1970s through the 1990s.

She was known for her roles on three different soaps. Secrets of Midland Heights as Ann Dulles;[2] King's Crossing as Jillian Beauchamp;[3] and Emerald Point N.A.S. as Ensign Leslie Mallory.[4] She also played Charlene Chasen in the short-lived NBC-TV drama Nightingales.[5]

Personal life[edit]

Clark currently resides in Hollywood Hills, California. She is married to producer Peter Abrams and they have two children.

References[edit]

  1. ^ Walz, Steve K. (January 20, 1982). "Media Monitor: Clark's ready to make her mark". Pennsylvania, DuBois. DuBois Courier Express. p. 27. Retrieved March 25, 2016 – via Newspaperarchive.com.  open access publication – free to read
  2. ^ Boyer, Peter J. (September 6, 1998). "New Soap Dreadful, But Could Become Hit". Pennsylvania, Indiana. The Indiana Gazette. p. 24. Retrieved March 25, 2016 – via Newspapers.com.  open access publication – free to read
  3. ^ Handler, David (March 18, 2001). "Family Leisure TV News: Prime time breakthrough". Pennsylvania, Indiana. The Indiana Gazette. p. 34. Retrieved March 25, 2016 – via Newspapers.com.  open access publication – free to read
  4. ^ Handler, David (June 1, 1999). "Relevancy tarnishes 'Emerald's' glitter". Pennsylvania, Indiana. The Indiana Gazette. p. 10. Retrieved March 25, 2016 – via Newspapers.com.  open access publication – free to read
  5. ^ Terrace, Vincent (2011). Encyclopedia of Television Shows, 1925 through 2010. McFarland & Company, Inc. ISBN 978-0-7864-6477-7. P. 763.