Doris Bergen

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Doris Bergen
Born1960 (1960)
Saskatchewan, Canada
Academic background
EducationB.A., 1982, University of Saskatchewan
M.A., Modern European History, 1984, University of Alberta
PhD., University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill
ThesisOne Reich, one people, one church: the German Christian movement and the People's Church, 1932-1945 (1995)
Academic advisorsGerhard Weinberg
Academic work
DisciplineHistory
Sub-disciplineHolocaust
InstitutionsUniversity of Vermont
University of Notre Dame
University of Toronto
Main interestsreligion, gender and ethnicity in the Holocaust

Doris Leanna Bergen (born 1960)[1] FRSC is a Holocaust historian. She is the Chancellor Rose and Ray Wolfe Professor of Holocaust Studies at the University of Toronto, the only endowed chair in Canada in Holocaust history. Bergen is also a member of the Academic Advisory Committee of the Center for Advanced Holocaust Studies at the United States Holocaust Memorial Museum. She was elected a Fellow of the Royal Society of Canada in 2018.

Early life and education[edit]

Bergen is of German and Ukraine descent and she was raised a Mennonite in Saskatchewan.[2] While her parents fled Ukraine in the early 1920s, Bergen had family in Europe who witnessed the Holocaust.[3] After earning her Bachelor of Arts from the University of Saskatchewan, Bergen was educated at the University of Alberta and University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill.[4] While writing her PhD dissertation in North Carolina, Bergen studied under the direction of Gerhard Weinberg, a professor with a focus on WW2.[5]

Career[edit]

Bergen began her academic career at the University of Vermont.[6] While teaching at Vermont since 1991,[7] Bergen was also a visiting instructor at the Universities of Warsaw, Tuzla, and Pristina.[8] In 1996, Bergen was hired by the University of Notre Dame in their history department. She specialized in 20th century German history, with an emphasis on the Nazi era and the Holocaust, and European women’s history.[4] During this time, Bergen published "Twisted cross: the German Christian movement in the Third Reich" which focused on how the Protestant church responded to Nazism.[9]

A year later, in 1997, Bergen held a Fellowship for Archival Research at the United States Holocaust Memorial Museum.[10] In 1999, Bergen was a fellow at the Institute on the Holocaust and Jewish Civilization at Northwestern University.[11] Bergen would later admit that her interest in Holocaust studies grew from her personal connection to the Mennonite communities. While keeping a strong focus on the Jewish place during the Holocaust, Bergen was also interested in the oft-forgotten groups in the Holocaust narrative such as the disabled, the Roma, Soviet prisoners of war, and Polish civilians.[12] After returning to Notre Dame, Bergen published "War and Genocide: A Concise History of the Holocaust" in 2003. This book analyzed the varying experiences of violence of different groups of perpetrators, victims and other participants during the Holocaust.[13] She later edited a book on military chaplains and the development of the military chaplaincy published through the University of Notre Dame Press.[4] In 2006, before taking a leave of absence, Bergen was elected Chair of the University Committee on Women Faculty and Students.[14] In 2007, Bergen was named a Full Professor at the University of Toronto (UoT).[15] She also replaced Michael Marrus as the Chancellor Rose and Ray Wolfe Professor of Holocaust Studies at the University of Toronto. This is the only endowed chair in Canada in Holocaust history.[16] The following year, she was awarded the Graduate History Society Distinguished Service Award.[17] After the 2009-10 academic year, Bergen was elected a Senior Fellow at Massey College, Toronto.[18]

In 2012, Bergen was awarded UoT's Ludwik and Estelle Jus Memorial Human Rights Prize[19] and named a member of the Academic Advisory Committee of the Center for Advanced Holocaust Studies at the United States Holocaust Memorial Museum.[20] While assuming this role, she was also selected by Jason Kenney as an Advisory Council Members for the International Task Force on Holocaust Education, Remembrance and Research.[21] Two years later, in 2014, Bergen was named to the National Holocaust Monument design team.[22] The monument would go on to win the 2018 AIA New York Design Awards.[23]

In 2015, Bergen was selected as a final juror for the Laura Shannon Prize.[24] Two years later, Bergen collaborated with photographer Edward Burtynsky to produce "Chai," a book featuring images from various Holocaust sites in Germany, Austria, the Czech Republic, Poland, Lithuania and Hungary.[25] Following this, Bergen was one of eleven UoT professors elected to the Royal Society of Canada[26] and sat on UoT's 2018–19 Policy Committee.[27] She also serves on the Editorial Advisory Board for the University of Toronto Press Genocide Studies.[28]

Selected publications[edit]

The following is a list of selected publications:[29]

  • Women, gender, and the church struggle: the German Christian movement's quest for a manly church (1992)
  • Twisted cross: the German Christian movement in the Third Reich (1996)
  • The Sword of the Lord: Military Chaplains from the First to the Twenty-First Centuries (2004)
  • From generation to generation (2008)
  • The Holocaust: a new history (2009)

References[edit]

  1. ^ "Gastprofessur". jenacenter.uni-jena.de (in German). Retrieved 10 August 2019.
  2. ^ Lewis, Charles (November 6, 2011). "German military chaplains caught between word of God and horror of man". National Post. Retrieved August 8, 2019.
  3. ^ Marrus, Michael R.; Shain, Milton; Browning, Christopher R.; Heschel, Susannah, eds. (2015). Holocaust Scholarship: Personal Trajectories and Professional Interpretations. Springer. p. 149. ISBN 9781137514196. Retrieved August 8, 2019.
  4. ^ a b c Chapla, Shannon (April 14, 2004). "Historian Bergen edits new book on military chaplains". news.nd.edu. Retrieved August 8, 2019.
  5. ^ "Kalamazoo College Lecture Will Focus on the Holocaust". kzoo.edu. March 26, 2015. Retrieved August 10, 2019.
  6. ^ Marrus, Michael R.; Shain, Milton; Browning, Christopher R.; Heschel, Susannah, eds. (2015). Holocaust Scholarship: Personal Trajectories and Professional Interpretations. Springer. p. 154. ISBN 9781137514196. Retrieved August 8, 2019.
  7. ^ "Out of the Limelight or In': Raul Hilberg and the Future of Holocaust Studies". list.uvm.edu. November 14, 2016. Retrieved August 9, 2019. she held positions at the University of Notre Dame and the University of Vermont (1991-1996)
  8. ^ "Overexposed and Underexposed: The Many Faces of the Lodz Ghetto". lodzghetto.ago.net. Retrieved August 9, 2019.
  9. ^ Besier, Gerhard (1999). "Reviewed Work: Twisted Cross. The German Christian Movement in the Third Reich by Doris L. Bergen". Historische Zeitschrift. 268 (1): 249–251. JSTOR 27632542.
  10. ^ "Doris Bergen". ushmm.org. Retrieved August 9, 2019.
  11. ^ "Fellows of the Institute on the Holocaust and Jewish Civilization – Northwestern University, 1999". hef.northwestern.edu. Retrieved August 9, 2019.
  12. ^ "Scholars uncover hidden stories of the Holocaust". canadianmennonite.org. March 20, 2018. Retrieved August 9, 2019.
  13. ^ Jackson, Francesina R. (2010). "A Review of "War and Genocide: A Concise History of the Holocaust"". Multicultural Perspectives. 12 (4): 235–236. doi:10.1080/15210960.2010.527595.
  14. ^ "Notre Dame Report" (PDF). archives.nd.edu. February 3, 2006. p. 292. Retrieved August 8, 2019.
  15. ^ "VANCOUVER HOLOCAUST EDUCATION CENTRE" (PDF). vhec.org. 2009. p. 11. Retrieved August 9, 2019.
  16. ^ King, Nancy (November 16, 2017). "Holocaust education as relevant as ever, says speaker". Cape Breton Post. Retrieved August 9, 2019.
  17. ^ "Graduate History Society". history.utoronto.ca. Retrieved August 9, 2019.
  18. ^ "Massey News" (PDF). creativeism.com. p. 15. Retrieved August 8, 2019.
  19. ^ "Awards OF EXCELLENCE". my.alumni.utoronto.ca. 2012. Retrieved August 9, 2019.
  20. ^ "CENTER FOR ADVANCED HOLOCAUST STUDIES" (PDF). migs.concordia.ca. Retrieved August 9, 2019.
  21. ^ "Minister Kenney Announces Advisory Council Members for International Task Force on Holocaust Education, Remembrance and Research". cija.ca. May 23, 2012. Retrieved August 8, 2019.
  22. ^ "National Holocaust Monument design team announced". cbc.ca. May 12, 2014. Retrieved August 8, 2019.
  23. ^ "Holocaust memorial, Daniels projects win NY Design awards". canada.constructconnect.com. February 16, 2018. Retrieved August 9, 2019.
  24. ^ Caro, Monica (February 26, 2015). "Nanovic Institute awards $10,000 Laura Shannon Prize to 'The Sleepwalkers'". news.nd.edu. Retrieved August 8, 2019.
  25. ^ Christopher Guly (February 23, 2018). "Master photographer Edward Burtynsky: Son of survivors". ukrweekly.com. The Ukraine Weekly. Retrieved August 10, 2019.
  26. ^ Mary Gooderham (September 11, 2018). "Eleven U of T scholars named fellows of prestigious national academy". utoronto.ca. Retrieved August 9, 2019.
  27. ^ "Faculty Committees 2018-2019". history.utoronto.ca. Archived from the original on January 10, 2019. Retrieved August 10, 2019.
  28. ^ "Editorial Advisory Board". utpjournals.press. Retrieved August 9, 2019.
  29. ^ "Bergen, Doris L". worldcat.org. Retrieved August 9, 2019.