Dornier Libelle

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Libelle
Dornier-Flugboot Libelle im Deutschen Museum.JPG
The Dornier Libelle II in the Deutsches Museum München
Role Flying boat
Manufacturer Dornier
Designer Claude Dornier
First flight 16 August 1921
Number built 2x Do A + 5x Libelle I + 3x Libelle II
Variants Dornier Spatz

The Dornier Libelle (en:"Dragonfly I"), also designated Do A, was a German open-cockpit, all-metal, parasol wing, monoplane flying boat aircraft, with partly fabric-covered wings. A landplane version, built without sponsons and fitted with a fixed tailwheel undercarriage was produced as the Dornier Spatz.[1]

Variants[edit]

Do A
Two prototypes of the Libelle[2]
Libelle I
The standard production model, five built, fitted with Siemens-Halske Sh 4 engines and two built with 59.7 kW (80 hp) Siemens-Halske Sh 5 engines.[2]
Libelle II
The improved Libelle II was powered by Siemens-Halske Sh 5 or 75 kW (101 hp) Siemens-Halske Sh 11 engines. Other engines fitted to Libelle II aircraft include the Bristol Lucifer and the ADC Cirrus. Three built.[2]

Survivor[edit]

A Libelle II VQ-FAB, manufacturers number 117 built in 1925, which operated in Fiji, is displayed in the Deutsches Museum in the centre of Munich.[3]

Specifications (Libelle I)[edit]

Data from [2]

General characteristics

  • Crew: one
  • Capacity: two passengers
  • Length: 7.18 m (23 ft 7 in)
  • Wingspan: 8.5 m (27 ft 11 in)
  • Height: 2.27 m (7 ft 5 in)
  • Wing area: 14 m2 (150 sq ft)
  • Empty weight: 420 kg (926 lb)
  • Gross weight: 640 kg (1,411 lb)
  • Fuel capacity: fuel 42 kg (93 lb)fuel + oil 10 kg (22 lb)
  • Powerplant: 1 × Siemens-Halske Sh 4 5-cyl. air-cooled radial piston engine, 45 kW (60 hp)

Performance

  • Maximum speed: 120 km/h (75 mph; 65 kn)
  • Cruise speed: 100 km/h (62 mph; 54 kn)
  • Range: 300 km (186 mi; 162 nmi)
  • Service ceiling: 1,600 m (5,200 ft)

References[edit]

  1. ^ "Dornier Spatz". Germany. Retrieved 25 February 2012. 
  2. ^ a b c d "Do A Libelle". Germany: histaviation.com. Retrieved 27 February 2012. 
  3. ^ Ogden, 2006. p. 202
  • "Do A Libelle". Germany: histaviation.com. Retrieved 27 February 2012. 
  • Donald, David, ed. (1997). The Encyclopedia of World Aircraft. Prospero Books. p. 347. ISBN 1-85605-375-X. 
  • Ogden, Bob (2006). Aviation Museums and Collections of Mainland Europe. Tonbridge, Kent: Air-Britain (Historians) Ltd. ISBN 0-85130-375-7. 

External links[edit]