Dorohoi County

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
Jump to navigation Jump to search
Județul Dorohoi
County (Județ)
The Dorohoi County Prefecture building of the interwar period.
The Dorohoi County Prefecture building of the interwar period.
Coat of arms of Județul Dorohoi
Coat of arms
Romania 1930 county Dorohoi.png
CountryFlag of Romania.svg Romania
Historic regionMoldavia
County seat (Reședință de județ)Dorohoi
Established1859
Ceased to existAdministrative reform of 1950
Area
 • Total2,846 km2 (1,099 sq mi)
Population
 (1930)
 • Total211,354
 • Density74/km2 (190/sq mi)
Time zoneUTC+2 (EET)
 • Summer (DST)UTC+3 (EEST)

Dorohoi County, with its seat at Dorohoi, was a subdivision of the Kingdom of Romania and located in the region of Moldavia.

Placement[edit]

The county was located in the northeastern part of Greater Romania, in the north-eastern extremity of the Moldavia region. Today the territory of the former county is split between Romania (north Botoșani County, with an area of 2,542 km²) and Ukraine (Hertza region, with an area of 304 km²). It bordered northwest with Cernăuți County, to the north and east with Hotin County, south Botoşani County, southwest with Suceava County, and west with Rădăuți County.

Administrative organization[edit]

Map of the county, with the district arrangement in 1938.

The county comprised five cities: Dorohoi, Darabani, Herța, Mihăileni and Săveni.

Administratively, Dorohoi County was originally divided into three districts (plăși):[1]

  1. Plasa Bașeu
  2. Plasa Herța
  3. Plasa Siret

Subsequently, two new districts were established:

  1. Plasa Centrală
  2. Plasa Lascăr

Population[edit]

According to the 1930 census data, the county population was 211,354 inhabitants, of which 92.1% were ethnic Romanians, 7.0% were ethnic Jews, as well as other minorities. From the religious point of view, 92.4% were Eastern Orthodox, 7.0% Jewish, 0.3% Roman Catholic, as well as other minorities.

Urban population[edit]

In 1930, the county's urban population was 43,707 inhabitants, 69.3% Romanians, 29.1% Jews, 0.6% Germans, as well as other minorities. In the urban area, languages were Romanian (71.1%), Yiddish (27.4%), German (0.6%), as well as other minorities. From the religious point of view, the urban population was composed of Eastern Orthodox (69.1%), Jewish (29.3%), Roman Catholic (0.9%), as well as other minorities.

See also[edit]

References[edit]

External links[edit]