Dots and Loops

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
Jump to navigation Jump to search
Dots and Loops
Stereolabdotsandloops.png
Studio album by
Released22 September 1997 (1997-09-22)
RecordedMarch–April 1997
Studio
  • Idful Music Corp., Chicago, Illinois
  • Academy of St. Martin in the Street, Düsseldorf
Genre
Length65:52
Label
Producer
Stereolab chronology
Fluorescences
(1996)
Dots and Loops
(1997)
Miss Modular
(1997)
Stereolab studio album chronology
Emperor Tomato Ketchup
(1996)
Dots and Loops
(1997)
Cobra and Phases Group Play Voltage in the Milky Night
(1999)
Singles from Dots and Loops
  1. "Miss Modular"
    Released: 1 September 1997 (EP)
Professional ratings
Review scores
SourceRating
AllMusic4/5 stars[1]
Chicago Tribune3/4 stars[3]
Entertainment WeeklyA[2]
The Guardian4/5 stars[4]
Los Angeles Times3/4 stars[5]
NME8/10[6]
Pitchfork9.2/10[7]
Rolling Stone3.5/5 stars[8]
Spin8/10[9]
The Village VoiceB[10]

Dots and Loops is the fifth studio album by English-French rock band Stereolab. It was released on 22 September 1997 in the United Kingdom by Duophonic Records and in the United States by Elektra Records. Andi Toma and Jan St. Werner of Mouse on Mars contributed to several tracks, and the album was co-produced by Andi Toma with the band. It was the band’s second (and final) UK Top 20 success.

By August 1999, the album had sold over 75,000 copies in the United States, according to Nielsen SoundScan.[11] Dots and Loops was the band's first entry on the US Billboard 200 chart, where it peaked at number 111. The song "Parsec" was used for the launch of the Volkswagen New Beetle.[12]

Track listing[edit]

All tracks are written by Tim Gane and Lætitia Sadier, except where indicated.

No.TitleWriter(s)Length
1."Brakhage" 5:30
2."Miss Modular" 4:29
3."The Flower Called Nowhere" 4:55
4."Diagonals" 5:15
5."Prisoner of Mars" 4:03
6."Rainbo Conversation" 4:46
7."Refractions in the Plastic Pulse"
  • Gane
  • Sadier
  • Andy Ramsay
17:32
8."Parsec" 5:34
9."Ticker-Tape of the Unconscious" 4:45
10."Contronatura" 9:03
Total length:65:52
Japanese bonus track
No.TitleLength
11."Off-On"5:25
Total length:71:17

Recording information[edit]

Chicago

  • Tracks 1,2,4,6,7,8,9
  • Recorded at Idful Music Corp. during March 1997
  • Produced by John McEntire and Stereolab
  • Engineering and mixing: John McEntire

Düsseldorf

  • Tracks 3, 5, 10
  • Recorded at Academy of St. Martin in the Street during April 1997
  • Produced by Andi Toma and Stereolab
  • Engineering and mixing: Andi Toma
  • Additional engineering by Jan St. Werner & M. Stamm

Personnel[edit]

Credits for Dots and Loops adapted from album liner notes.[13]

Stereolab

Additional musicians

  • Jeb Bishop – brass
  • Poppy Branders – strings
  • Dave Max Crawford – brass
  • Xavier "Fischfinger" Fischer – piano
  • Marcus Holdaway – string arrangements
  • Maureen Loughnane – strings
  • Douglas McCombs – acoustic bass
  • John McEntire – analogue synthesiser, electronics, percussion, vibraphone, marimba
  • Rebecca McFaul – strings
  • Paul Mertens – brass
  • Sean O'Hagan – piano, Rhodes piano, Farfisa organ, brass and string arrangements
  • Ross Reed – brass
  • Andy Robinson – brass arrangements
  • Jan St. Werner – sound effects, insect horns
  • Andi Toma – electronic percussion, sound effects
  • Shelley Weiss – strings

Production

  • John McEntire – production, mixing, recording
  • Jan St. Werner – engineering
  • Max Stamm – engineering (additional)
  • Stereolab – production, mixing
  • Andi Toma – production, engineering, mixing, recording

Charts[edit]

Chart (1997) Peak
position
Norwegian Albums (VG-lista)[14] 38
Scottish Albums (OCC)[15] 41
UK Albums (OCC)[16] 19
US Billboard 200[17] 111
US Heatseekers Albums (Billboard)[18] 2

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b c Erlewine, Stephen Thomas. "Dots and Loops – Stereolab". AllMusic. Retrieved 31 May 2016.
  2. ^ a b Sinclair, Tom (26 September 1996). "Dots and Loops". Entertainment Weekly. Retrieved 31 May 2016.
  3. ^ Kot, Greg (26 September 1997). "Stereolab: Dots and Loops (Elektra)". Chicago Tribune. Retrieved 12 July 2016.
  4. ^ Sweeney, Kathy (26 September 1997). "Stereolab: Dots and Loops (Duophonic)". The Guardian.
  5. ^ Ali, Lorraine (27 September 1997). "Stereolab, 'Dots and Loops,' Elektra". Los Angeles Times. Retrieved 12 July 2016.
  6. ^ Dalton, Stephen (20 September 1997). "Stereolab – Dots And Loops". NME. Archived from the original on 17 August 2000. Retrieved 31 May 2016.
  7. ^ Harvey, Eric (23 July 2017). "Stereolab: Dots and Loops". Pitchfork. Retrieved 25 July 2017.
  8. ^ Hoskyns, Barney (29 October 1997). "Stereolab: Dots & Loops". Rolling Stone. Archived from the original on 28 August 2009. Retrieved 31 May 2016.
  9. ^ Sutton, Terri (November 1997). "Stereolab: Dots and Loops". Spin. 13 (8): 144. Retrieved 31 May 2016.
  10. ^ Christgau, Robert (3 March 1998). "Consumer Guide". The Village Voice. Retrieved 31 May 2016.
  11. ^ Gidley, Lisa (28 August 1999). "Elektra Plugs Stereolab's 'Voltage'". Billboard. 111 (35): 100. Retrieved 3 September 2018.
  12. ^ Parker, Doug (27 September 1998). "Stereolab – Dots and Loops". Blue Cricket. Retrieved 31 May 2016.
  13. ^ Dots and Loops (liner notes). Stereolab. Duophonic Records. 1997. D-UHF-CD17.CS1 maint: others (link)
  14. ^ "Norwegiancharts.com – Stereolab – Dots and Loops". Hung Medien. Retrieved 18 July 2018.
  15. ^ "Official Scottish Albums Chart Top 100". Official Charts Company. Retrieved 18 July 2018.
  16. ^ "Official Albums Chart Top 100". Official Charts Company. Retrieved 8 November 2017.
  17. ^ "Stereolab Chart History (Billboard 200)". Billboard. Retrieved 8 November 2017.
  18. ^ "Stereolab Chart History (Heatseekers Albums)". Billboard. Retrieved 8 November 2017.

External links[edit]