Doug Allder

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
Jump to: navigation, search
Doug Allder
Personal information
Full name Douglas Stewart Allder[1]
Date of birth (1951-12-30) 30 December 1951 (age 65)
Place of birth Hammersmith, England
Playing position Left winger
Youth career
1968–1969 Millwall
Senior career*
Years Team Apps (Gls)
1969–1975 Millwall 203 (10)
1975–1977 Orient 41 (0)
1977 Torquay United 0 (0)
1977 Watford 1 (0)
1977–1980 Brentford 88 (2)
1980–1981 Tooting & Mitcham United 21 (1)
1981 Walton & Hersham
1981–1982 Staines Town
Total 354 (13)
National team
England Youth
* Senior club appearances and goals counted for the domestic league only.

Douglas Stewart Allder (born 30 December 1951 in Hammersmith, London) is an English former professional footballer. He played as a left winger, making 332 appearances in his career.[2] He was capped for England at youth level and is a member of the Millwall Hall of Fame.[3]

Playing career[edit]

Millwall[edit]

Allder began his career with Division Two side Millwall, signing apprentice terms in April 1968 for £4 a week.[4] He signed a professional contract in October 1969,[2] worth £20 a week.[4] He made his debut and broke into the team during the 1969–70 season, making 24 appearances.[5] A dispute with Benny Fenton in 1971 saw Allder play on a week-to-week contract and he nearly moved to play under Gordon Jago at divisional rivals Queens Park Rangers.[4] The move was cancelled after Jago replaced Fenton as Millwall manager, meaning Allder would remain at The Den.[4] The Lions occasionally challenged for promotion to Division One,[6] but relegation to Division Three at the end of the 1974–75 season saw Allder depart the club.[7] In his six years with Millwall he made 227 appearances and scored 12 goals.[7] Allder has been voted into the Millwall Hall of Fame.[8]

Orient[edit]

In July 1975, Allder moved to Division Two side Orient in exchange for Terry Brisley and Barrie Fairbrother.[2] He left Orient at the end of the 1976–77 season, after making 41 league appearances without scoring.[9] Looking back in 2002, Allder said "I knew straight away it was a bad move. I wasn't happy there".[4]

Free agent[edit]

Allder had a month's trial with Division Four side Torquay United in August 1977,[3] making one appearance as a substitute for Lindsay Parsons in a League Cup tie away at Cardiff City.[10] In September 1977 he had another month-long trial with Watford,[4] making a single appearance away at Rochdale in which he was substituted at half-time.[2] Watford would go on to win the 1977–78 Division Four title, with Allder receiving a winners' medal from chairman Elton John after the final game of the season against Brentford.[4]

Brentford[edit]

In October 1977, Allder joined Division Four club Brentford on trial,[11] after being pressed by manager Bill Dodgin.[4] He quickly became the regular left winger in the side and signed a professional contract.[11] The Bees were promoted to Division Three at the end of the season after securing a fourth-place finish.[12] Allder had an infamous brawl with Sheffield United's Mick Speight during a match at Griffin Park in November 1979, which resulted in the fight spilling over into the Sheffield United dugout and both players being sent off.[4] Allder was released at the end of the 1979–80 season,[4] having made 95 appearances and scored three goals during his time at Griffin Park.[1]

Non-league football[edit]

He left for Isthmian League side Tooting & Mitcham in 1980.[13] He moved to Staines Town in March 1981, before moving to Walton & Hersham.[3]

Coaching career[edit]

In 1992, he was working at the Millwall Centre of Excellence.[2]

Personal life[edit]

As of 2002, Allder was working at Heathrow Airport.[4]

Honours[edit]

As a player[edit]

Watford

Brentford

As an individual[edit]

Career statistics[edit]

Club Season League FA Cup League Cup Total
Division Apps Goals Apps Goals Apps Goals Apps Goals
Millwall 1969–70[5] Second Division 23 0 1 0 0 0 24 0
1970–71[14] 38 3 1 0 3 0 42 3
1971–72[15] 40 4 3 0 1 0 44 4
1972–73[16] 40 1 3 0 3 0 46 2
1973–74[17] 30 1 2 0 5 1 37 2
1974–75[18] 32 1 2 0 0 0 34 1
Total 203 10 12 0 12 1 227 11
Torquay United 1977–78[10] Fourth Division 0 0 1 0 1 0
Watford 1977–78[3] Fourth Division 1 0 1 0
Brentford 1977–78[12] Fourth Division 31 2 2 0 33 2
1978–79[12] Third Division 30 0 0 0 2 0 32 0
1979–80[12] 27 0 1 0 2 1 30 1
Total 88 2 3 0 4 1 95 3
Career total 292 12 15 0 17 2 324 14

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b Haynes, Graham; Coumbe, Frank (2006). Timeless Bees: Brentford F.C. Who's Who 1920–2006. Harefield: Yore Publications. p. 9. ISBN 978-0955294914. 
  2. ^ a b c d e Jones, Trefor (1996). The Watford Football Club Illustrated Who's Who. Surrey: T.G Jones. ISBN 0-9527458-0-1. , pp 22
  3. ^ a b c d "Watford Football Club archive 1881–2016" (PDF). p. 12. Retrieved 7 November 2016. 
  4. ^ a b c d e f g h i j k l m Lane, David (2002). Cult Bees & Legends: Volume One. Hampton Wick: Woodpecker Multimedia. pp. 73–87. ASIN B00NGFXBBG. ISBN 0-9543682-0-7. 
  5. ^ a b "Millwall Season 69/70 Stats". www.millwall-history.org.uk. Retrieved 9 January 2017. 
  6. ^ "Football Club History Database – Millwall". fchd.info. Retrieved 31 March 2015. 
  7. ^ a b "Top 20 Appearances". millwall-history.org.uk. Retrieved 31 March 2015. 
  8. ^ a b © Millwall FC. "The Millwall Hall of Fame". millwallfc.co.uk. Archived from the original on 1 October 2012. Retrieved 31 March 2015. 
  9. ^ "Doing The 92 ~ Doug Allder". doingthe92.com. Archived from the original on 5 March 2016. Retrieved 31 March 2015. 
  10. ^ a b Edwards, Leigh. The definitive Torquay United F.C. ISBN 1-899468-09-9. 
  11. ^ a b Croxford, Mark; Lane, David; Waterman, Greville (2011). The Big Brentford Book of the Seventies. Sunbury, Middlesex: Legends Publishing. pp. 287–288. ISBN 978-1906796709. 
  12. ^ a b c d White, Eric, ed. (1989). 100 Years Of Brentford. Brentford FC. pp. 394–395. ISBN 0951526200. 
  13. ^ "Tooting & Mitcham United FC Archive – Season 1980–81". www.tmu-fc.co.uk. Archived from the original on 16 January 2017. Retrieved 15 January 2017. 
  14. ^ "Millwall Stats 1970–1971". www.millwall-history.org.uk. Retrieved 9 January 2017. 
  15. ^ "Millwall Stats 1971–72". www.millwall-history.org.uk. Retrieved 9 January 2017. 
  16. ^ "Millwall Stats 1972–73". www.millwall-history.org.uk. Retrieved 9 January 2017. 
  17. ^ "Millwall Stats 1973–74". www.millwall-history.org.uk. Retrieved 9 January 2017. 
  18. ^ "Millwall Stats 1974–75". www.millwall-history.org.uk. Retrieved 9 January 2017.