Doug Ford (musician)

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Doug Ford
Fete de la Musique Brisbane 2010 (5469941558) (2).jpg
Background information
Born (1945-01-26) 26 January 1945 (age 72)
Origin Casino, New South Wales, Australia
Genres Rock n Roll, pop
Occupation(s) Rock guitarist
Labels Astor, EMI, Virgin, Gemstone, Liberation Blue
Associated acts The Masters Apprentices

Doug Ford is an Australian rock guitarist and songwriter since the 1960s.[1][2][3] During 1968–1972, Ford was the lead guitarist in the Australian pop-rock band The Masters Apprentices and established a successful writing partnership with the group's lead singer Jim Keays.[1]

Biography[edit]

Ford was born in Casino, New South Wales on 26 January 1945. He first came to prominence in the mid-1960s in Sydney as a member of the second incarnation of Australian rock group The Missing Links (1965–66). This was followed by a stint in the Links' Melbourne-based successor Running, Jumping, Standing Still (1966–67).

From 1968 to 1972, Ford was the lead guitarist in the popular Australian pop-rock band The Masters Apprentices and he established a successful writing partnership with the group's lead singer Jim Keays.

The version of the group that included Ford, Keays, bassist Glenn Wheatley and drummer Colin Burgess made some of the band's most successful recordings, including the singles "5:10 Man", "Turn Up Your Radio", "Because I Love You" and "Love Is" and the album Choice Cuts (1971), which was recorded at the Abbey Road Studios in London.

Ford stayed in England when the Masters split and wrote and performed with a number of UK musicians. He also lived and worked in Spain and Portugal for a short while. He returned to Australia in the 1980s and rejoined The Masters Apprentices in 1988–1991. Ford was also part of a further reunion in 1997 and the "Long Way To The Top" tours in 2002/3.

"Because I Love You" has been used in a number of advertising campaigns.

Ford has recently formed the Doug Ford Trio and started performing around Queensland.

References[edit]

General
Specific
  1. ^ a b Mc Farlane, 1999, 'The Master's Apprentices' entry at the Wayback Machine (archived 18 June 2004).
  2. ^ Mc Farlane, 1999, 'Jim Keays' entry at the Wayback Machine (archived 30 September 2004).
  3. ^ Kimball, 2002.
  4. ^ "Who's who of Australian rock / compiled by Chris Spencer, Zbig Nowara & Paul McHenry". catalogue. National Library of Australia. Retrieved 29 January 2010.