Douglas Letter

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Douglas Letter
NationalityUnited States
OccupationAttorney

Douglas Letter is general counsel to the United States House of Representatives, a position he has held since 2018.[1] From 1978 to 2018 he was an attorney in the United States Department of Justice, ultimately serving as director of the appellate staff for the Civil Division.[2][1][3][4][5]

During a 2014 hearing before a federal court in which Letter was representing the United States Government in a lawsuit brought by the Electronic Frontier Foundation, he made headlines after providing erroneous information to judges regarding the legality of National Security Letters.[6][4][7] The Justice Department later issued a written apology to the court for Letter's statement.[4]

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b McNamara, Audrey (December 28, 2018). "Nancy Pelosi Appoints Douglas Letter New General Counsel of the House". Daily Beast. Retrieved July 9, 2019.
  2. ^ Johnson, Carrie (March 12, 2018). "40 Years Of Experience Walks Out The Door Of The Justice Department". National Public Radio. Retrieved July 9, 2019.
  3. ^ Ruger, Todd (June 10, 2019). "Unassuming House counsel is a key player in Trump-Congress fights". Roll Call. Retrieved July 9, 2019.
  4. ^ a b c Mullin, Joe (November 13, 2014). "DOJ admits its lawyer misled appeals court during oral argument". Ars Technica. Retrieved July 9, 2019.
  5. ^ Tuccille, J.D. (November 14, 2014). "Justice Department Lied in Court About National Security Letters". Reason. Retrieved July 9, 2019.
  6. ^ Sledge, Matt (November 13, 2014). "Government Admits 'Misstatement' In Key Surveillance Lawsuit". Huffington Post. Retrieved July 9, 2019.
  7. ^ Tuccille, J.D. (November 14, 2014). "Justice Department Lied in Court About National Security Letters". Reason. Retrieved July 9, 2019.