Dowa Holdings

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Dowa Holdings Co., Ltd.
Native name
DOWAホールディングス株式会社
Public KK
Traded asTYO: 5714
NAG: 5714
FSE: 5714
Nikkei 225 component
ISINJP3638600001
IndustryNonferrous metals
Founded(September 18, 1884; 135 years ago (1884-09-18))
FounderDenzaburo Fujita
Headquarters
Akihabara UDX building, Sotokanda, Chiyoda-ku, Tokyo, 101-0021
,
Japan
Area served
Worldwide
Key people
Masao Yamada
(President)
Products
Services
RevenueIncrease JPY 454.7 billion (FY 2017) (US$ 4.2 billion) (FY 2017)
Decrease JPY 24.6 billion (FY 2017) (US$ 232 million) (FY 2017)
Number of employees
6,400 (as of March 31, 2018)
WebsiteOfficial website
Footnotes / references
[1][2][3]

Dowa Holdings (DOWAホールディングス株式会社, DOWA Hōrudingusu Kabushiki-gaisha) is a Japanese nonferrous metals manufacturer.[3] The company is a component of the Nikkei 225 stock index.[4]

History[edit]

Fujita-gumi, the forerunner of DOWA,[5] was established by three brothers from Yamaguchi prefecture in 1881. The brothers had personal connections with influential members of the government, so in 1884 they bought the Kosaka mine, from which they expanded their business into various fields, centered on the coal mining business.[6] After the purchase, Fujita-gumi increased its capital and invested heavily in skilled labor and equipment. By 1888 the Kosaka mine became Japan's top producer of silver.[6]

In 1900, an engineer at Kosaka succeeded in extracting copper by accessing the kuroko (black ore — a mixture of copper, zinc and lead) deep in the mine. After that, the Kosaka changed its focus from silver to copper, and in 1907 became Japan's largest top producer.[5]

References[edit]

  1. ^ "Corporate Outline". Dowa Holdings. Retrieved February 26, 2016.
  2. ^ "About the company". Financial Times. Retrieved February 27, 2019.
  3. ^ a b "Company Profile". Nikkei Asian Review. Nikkei Inc. Retrieved February 27, 2019.
  4. ^ "Components:Nikkei Stock Average (Nikkei 225)". Nikkei Inc. Retrieved February 26, 2016.
  5. ^ a b Joanaz de Melo, Cristina; Vaz, Estelita; M. Costa Pinto, Lígia (October 21, 2016). Environmental History in the Making: Volume II: Acting. Springer Science+Business Media. pp. 206–207. ISBN 978-3-319-41139-2.
  6. ^ a b Hunter, Janet; Storz, Cornelia (June 28, 2006). Institutional and Technological Change in Japan's Economy: Past and Present. Routledge. pp. 32–33. ISBN 978-1-134-20681-0.

External links[edit]