Down with the King (song)

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"Down with the King"
Down with the Kings.jpg
Single by Run-DMC featuring Pete Rock & CL Smooth
from the album Down with the King
B-side"Down with the King (Instrumental)"
ReleasedMarch 2, 1993 (1993-03-02)
Recorded1992
GenreHip hop
Length5:00
LabelProfile
Songwriter(s)
Producer(s)Pete Rock
Run–D.M.C. singles chronology
"Faces"
(1991)
"Down with the King"
(1993)
"Ooh, Whatcha Gonna Do"
(1993)

"Down with the King" is the first single from Run-DMC's sixth studio album Down with the King. It featured Pete Rock & CL Smooth with Pete Rock producing the song.

After three unsuccessful singles from the group's previous album, "Down with the King" became Run-D.M.C.'s second-biggest hit after "Walk This Way", peaking at No. 21 on the Billboard Hot 100 and becoming their only single to reach the top spot on Hot Rap Singles chart.

The music video, which was directed by Marcus Raboy, received heavy airplay and featured cameos from Eazy-E, Redman, Kris Kross, Jermaine Dupri, Onyx, Salt-n-Pepa, KRS-One, EPMD, A Tribe Called Quest, De La Soul, MC Lyte, Kid Capri, Das EFX, P.M. Dawn and Naughty by Nature. The song contains samples of James Rado's "Where Do I Go" from the original Broadway cast recording of the rock musical Hair and Run–D.M.C.'s 1988 single "Run's House". Pete Rock and CL Smooth's verses contain reused lyrics from Run DMC's 1983 single "Sucker M.C.'s". "Down with the King" was certified Gold by the RIAA on May 11, 1993.

Track listing[edit]

A-side[edit]

  1. "Down with the King" – 5:00

B-side[edit]

  1. "Down with the King" (instrumental) – 5:18
  2. "Down with the King" (radio version) – 4:15

Charts[edit]

Weekly charts[edit]

Chart (1993) Peak
position
Australia (ARIA)[1] 81
UK Singles (OCC)[2] 69
US Billboard Hot 100[3] 21
US Hot R&B/Hip-Hop Songs (Billboard)[4] 9
US Hot Rap Songs (Billboard)[5] 1
US Rhythmic (Billboard)[6] 33

Year-end charts[edit]

Chart (1993) Position
US Hot R&B/Hip-Hop Songs (Billboard)[7] 84

References[edit]

  1. ^ Ryan, Gavin (2011). Australia's Music Charts 1988–2010 (PDF ed.). Mt Martha, Victoria, Australia: Moonlight Publishing. p. 241.
  2. ^ "Official Singles Chart Top 100". Official Charts Company. Retrieved September 12, 2022.
  3. ^ "Run-D.M.C. Chart History (Hot 100)". Billboard. Retrieved October 22, 2021.
  4. ^ "Run-D.M.C. Chart History (Hot R&B/Hip-Hop Songs)". Billboard. Retrieved October 22, 2021.
  5. ^ "Run-D.M.C. Chart History (Hot Rap Songs)". Billboard. Retrieved October 22, 2021.
  6. ^ "Run-D.M.C. Chart History (Rhythmic)". Billboard. Retrieved October 22, 2021.
  7. ^ "Hot R&B/Hip-Hop Songs – Year-End 1993". Billboard. Retrieved October 22, 2021.