Downtown Durham Historic District

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
Jump to navigation Jump to search
Downtown Durham Historic District
Carolina Theatre, Durham, NC.jpg
Carolina Theatre, Downtown Durham Historic District, September 2019
Downtown Durham Historic District is located in North Carolina
Downtown Durham Historic District
Downtown Durham Historic District is located in the United States
Downtown Durham Historic District
LocationRoughly bounded by Peabody, Morgan, Seminary, Cleveland, Parrish, and Queen Sts., Durham, North Carolina
Coordinates35°59′42″N 78°54′01″W / 35.99500°N 78.90028°W / 35.99500; -78.90028Coordinates: 35°59′42″N 78°54′01″W / 35.99500°N 78.90028°W / 35.99500; -78.90028
Area0 acres (0 ha)
ArchitectMultiple
Architectural styleLate 19th And 20th Century Revivals, Art Deco
NRHP reference #77000998[1]
Added to NRHPNovember 1, 1977

Downtown Durham Historic District is a national historic district located at Durham, Durham County, North Carolina. The district encompasses 97 contributing buildings and 1 contributing structure in the central business district of Durham. The buildings primarily date from the first four decades of the 20th century and include notable examples of Colonial Revival, Italianate, and Art Deco architecture. Notable buildings include the St. Philip's Episcopal Church (1907), Trinity Methodist Episcopal Church (1880-1881), First Baptist Church (1926-1927), Durham County Courthouse (1916), Durham Auditorium (Carolina Theatre, 1920s), Tempest Building (1894, 1905), National Guard Armory (1934-1937), United States Post Office (1934), Trust Building (1904), First National Bank Building (1913-1915), Mechanics and Farmers Bank (1921), Johnson Motor Company showroom (1927), Hill Building (1935), Snow Building (1933), and S. H. Kress store.[2][3]

It was listed on the National Register of Historic Places in 1977.[1]

On August 14, 2017 a 15-foot-high statue of an armed Confederate patriot was torn down in front of the 1916 Durham County Courthouse by demonstrators. The destruction of the statue followed the 2017 Unite the Right rally in Charlottesville, Virginia where one counter-demonstrator was killed.[4]

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b "National Register Information System". National Register of Historic Places. National Park Service. July 9, 2010.
  2. ^ H. McKelden Smith and John B. Flowers (n.d.). "Downtown Durham Historic District" (pdf). National Register of Historic Places - Nomination and Inventory. North Carolina State Historic Preservation Office. Retrieved 2014-11-01.
  3. ^ Cynthia de Miranda (June 2012). "Downtown Durham Historic District Additional Documentation" (pdf). National Register of Historic Places - Nomination and Inventory. North Carolina State Historic Preservation Office. Retrieved 2014-11-01.
  4. ^ Horton, Alex (August 14, 2017). "Protesters in North Carolina topple Confederate statue following Charlottesville violence". Washington Post. Retrieved August 14, 2017.