Dr. Mario: Miracle Cure

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Dr. Mario: Miracle Cure
DrMarioMiracleCureartwork.png
Developer(s) Arika
Nintendo SPD Group No. 2
Publisher(s) Nintendo
Director(s) Takao Nakano
Producer(s) Hitoshi Yamagami
Ichirou Mihara
Designer(s) Tatsuya Ushiroda
Composer(s) Masaru Tajima
Series Dr. Mario
Platform(s) Nintendo 3DS
Release
  • JP: May 31, 2015
  • NA: June 11, 2015
  • EU: June 11, 2015
  • AU: June 11, 2015
Genre(s) Puzzle
Mode(s) Single-player, multiplayer

Dr. Mario: Miracle Cure[a] is a puzzle video game for the Nintendo 3DS. It was released in Japan on May 31, 2015 and North America, Europe and Australia on June 11, 2015.[1]

Gameplay[edit]

Dr. Mario: Miracle Cure is a falling block tile-matching video game and offers five distinct game modes with the option to use power-ups in each mode. The first mode, "Dr. Mario", is played using the traditional rules of the Dr. Mario series. In "Dr. Luigi", two different capsules joined together to create L-shaped configurations are dropped into the playing field at a time (The same mechanic was used in the "Operation L" mode of the video game of the same name). Both of these modes are each available in single player and competitive multiplayer modes. "Virus Buster", a game mode that was featured in Dr. Mario Online Rx and Dr. Luigi, is played by holding the Nintendo 3DS vertically and using the touchscreen to drag the capsules via a drag and drop interface. There is also an online mode that utilizes the Nintendo Network service. Finally, there is the debuting "Miracle Cure Laboratory" mode, which features a number of set challenges to complete. Unlike previous entries in the series, there are no songs to choose from the soundtrack, and instead random songs from Dr. Mario Online Rx and Dr. Luigi play during every game.

Reception[edit]

The game has a score of 69% on Metacritic.[2]

Jason Venter of GameSpot rated the game seven out of ten. He praised the power-ups new to the series and the subsequent new puzzles, but felt that the game needed more than 50 puzzles. Venter also appreciated the return of the Dr. Luigi and Virus Buster gameplay modes.[3]

Notes[edit]

  1. ^ Released in Japan as Dr. Mario Gyakuten! Tokkōyaku & Saikin Bokumetsu (Dr. MARIO ギャクテン!特効薬 & 細菌撲滅, lit. Dr. Mario Reverse! Wonder Drug and Bacteria Eradication)

References[edit]

  1. ^ Farokhmanesh, Megan (June 1, 2015). "Dr. Mario: Miracle Cure coming to Nintendo 3DS June 11". Polygon. Retrieved June 1, 2015.
  2. ^ http://www.metacritic.com/game/3ds/dr-mario-miracle-cure
  3. ^ Venter, Jason (June 29, 2015). "Dr. Mario: Miracle Cure Review". GameSpot. CBS Interactive. Archived from the original on July 24, 2015. Retrieved July 24, 2015.

External links[edit]