Dracula tourism

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Bran Castle

Dracula tourism is a type of cultural tourism involving travel to sites associated with Dracula and his real or imaginary travels. There is Dracula Tourism in Transylvania, Romania and in the United Kingdom.

The most well-known Dracula Tourism locations to visit in Romania are:

  1. Bran Castle ("Castelul Bran"), considered to be the home of Dracula
  2. The City of Sighisoara, where you can visit the house in which Vlad the Impaler was born
  3. Old Princely Court ("Palatul Curtea Veche") in Bucharest
  4. Snagov Monastery ("Manastirea Snagov"), where, according to the legend, Vlad's remains were buried
  5. The ruins of the Poenari Fortress (considered to be the authentic Dracula's Castle)
  6. The village of Arefu, where Dracula legends are still told
  7. The city of Brasov, where Vlad led raids against the Saxons merchants.

Government attitude[edit]

Although Dracula tourism is a popular attraction in Romania, government leaders prefer other attractions within the country to be Romania's image. The National Tourism Masterplan restricted any Dracula theme parks from 2007 to 2026 to be initiated.[1] The Romanian government views Dracula tourism as a false image of Romania, as Dracula was from a fictional novel rather than a piece of Romanian history. Despite this, Dracula tourism has made an impact on the country's economy in the past and currently there are multiple attractions within the country.[1]

Initially Romania's government did not view Dracula tourism as problematic due to the positive economic change. Romania's historical Vlad the Impaler was the focus of the tours.[2]

Dracula park[edit]

Dracula Park was a theme park proposition by Radu Florescu in 1995.[3] The idea was to attract tourists worldwide and bring a larger audience to Romania and its identity with the fictional Transylvanian vampire.

There were over 5,000 share holders and multiple attractions were planned for the park, including a hotel.[4]

The theme park idea was rejected until 2001, six years after the initial proposal.[3]

Dracula Park gained widespread attention in its development. There was controversy on the theme park and if it would be harmful to Romania's image, and the Dracula Park project was dropped.[5]

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b "(PDF) DRACULA TOURISM IN ROMANIA: FROM NATIONAL TO LOCAL TOURISM STRATEGIES". ResearchGate. Retrieved 2019-02-14.
  2. ^ Hovi, Tuomas (2014). "The Use of History in Dracula Tourism in Romania" (PDF). Folklore: Electronic Journal of Folklore. 57: 55–78. doi:10.7592/FEJF2014.57.hovi.
  3. ^ a b Light, Duncan (2012). The Dracula Dilemma: Tourism, Identity and the State in Romania. Routledge.
  4. ^ Koranteng, Juliana (2002). "Romania's Dracula Park gets go-ahead: Beverage sponsors Bolster deal. (International News)". Business Insights: Global.
  5. ^ "(PDF) DRACULA TOURISM IN ROMANIA: FROM NATIONAL TO LOCAL TOURISM STRATEGIES". ResearchGate. Retrieved 2019-02-14.

Sources[edit]