Draft:Jennifer Byrne

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Jennifer Byrne
Scientific career
InstitutionsUniversity of Sydney Sydney Children’s Hospital

Jennifer Byrne AO FASSA is a Professor at University of Sydney, and the Sydney Children’s Hospital Australia. Byrne is notable for not only her oncology work, but the uncovering of academic fraud and junk science in cancer research.[1]

As a result of her investigations, at least ten papers have been retracted, and about 5 suspicious papers have been noted, alongside work with her colleague Cyril Labbe.[2] While reading on cancer research, Byrne noticed an odd pattern on a particular gene. The papers described ‘strikingly similar’ experiments on a gene that has been linked with childhood leukemia and breast cancer. She recognized the particular gene, because she had previously worked on it, with a team that had cloned the gene 20 years earlier.[3]

Her prior experience on that particular gene gave her experience to realize that all of the papers, all from China, were describing the wrong nucleotide sequence. A nuclueotide sequence is the specific order of letters which describes how a particular piece of DNA is composed. She noticed that the papers were describing the wrong sequence impacting cancer cells. This wrong sequence implies that: (1) Either the studies were not examining what they reported, or (2) the experiments had not been conducted as described. The implication is that each paper contains the seeds of bad research, that other papers were building on.[4]

Further evidence of fraud or junk science, was suggested as papers had almost identical reference lists, and used the same sequences for the opposite purposes. This means, e.g., that “a sequence used as a positive control in one research paper was used as a negative control in another”.[5]

A colleague described the importance of her whistleblowing cancer work as "finding fraud and bad science".[6]

“Projects like Jennifer’s actually are a key part of that. There are a lot more people looking at papers, there are a lot more available online, so people are finding more issues.” Undark.org described her work as a "fight for dubious cancer research".[7] Byrne also lost her mother to cancer.[1]

Research interests[edit]

Byrne has spent her career investigating adult and childhood cancer. She specializes in biobanking, cancer genetics as well as research integrity. [8] Her PhD involved mapping the loss of the chromosome 11p15 loci in tumours of embryos.[9]

Career[edit]

Bryne is currently employed as the head of the Children’s Cancer Research Unit within the Kids Research Institute, also at the Children’s Hospital at Westmead. Her other positions include Professor of Molecular Oncology, at the Sydney Medical School, at the University of Sydney. In addition, Bryne is the Deputy Director of a group called the Kids Cancer Alliance, which is a Translational Cancer Research Center within the Cancer Institute of NSW.[10]

Selected publications[edit]

  • We need to talk about systematic fraud. Nature. 6 February (2019).[11]
  • The LIM domain protein LMO4 interacts with the cofactor CtIP and the tumor suppressor BRCA1 and inhibits BRCA1 activity (2002) Sum, E., Peng, B, Yu, X., Chen, J, Byrne, J. et al. Journal of Biological Chemistry. 277:10 (7849-7856). [12]
  • Over-expression, amplification, and androgen regulation of TPD52 in prostate cancer (2004) Rubin, et al. Cancer research 64 (11), 3814-3822. [13]

Awards, honours and recognition[edit]

  • The journal Nature rated Byrne as one of "Ten people who matter".[14]
  • Nature Journal also rated Byrne as the only Australian, and named one of the Top 10 people to watch.[15]
  • Byrne was mentioned by Nature retraction watch. [16]
  • Byrne was an invited keynote speaker at the Sydney Cancer Conference, 2018.[17]

Media[edit]

  • The Sydney Morning Herald described her as one of ‘diverse individuals who have left a mark on science’.[18]
  • SBS described her work, and the praise from Nature on her work uncovering fraudulent science.[19]
  • Nature described Byrne as an “Error Sleuth”, and a researcher on a mission to expose flaws, and describes the tool she built to expose them.[20]
  • The tool used to detect flaws in cancer studies was described by the journal Nature.[21]
  • Byrne accepted the Kid's Cancer Project cheque for fund raising efforts for more effective cancer treatments .[22]

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b "Using Software to Fight Cancer Research Fraud". Undark. Retrieved 13 August 2019.
  2. ^ trevorlstokes, Author (19 January 2017). "What turned a cancer researcher into a literature watchdog?". Retraction Watch. Retrieved 13 August 2019.
  3. ^ "The Cancer Researcher Catching Scientific Fraud at Rapid Speed". www.yahoo.com. Retrieved 13 August 2019.
  4. ^ "Using Software to Fight Cancer Research Fraud". Undark. Retrieved 13 August 2019.
  5. ^ Aubusson, Kate (19 December 2017). "Sydney cancer scientist Jennifer Byrne named as one of 10 people who matter in science by Nature". The Sydney Morning Herald. Retrieved 13 August 2019.
  6. ^ "The Cancer Researcher Catching Scientific Fraud at Rapid Speed". www.yahoo.com. Retrieved 13 August 2019.
  7. ^ "Using Software to Fight Cancer Research Fraud". Undark. Retrieved 13 August 2019.
  8. ^ "Jennifer Anne Byrne - Google Scholar Citations". scholar.google.com.au. Retrieved 13 August 2019.
  9. ^ Sydney, The University of. "Professor Jennifer Byrne - The University of Sydney". sydney.edu.au. Retrieved 13 August 2019.
  10. ^ Sydney, The University of. "Professor Jennifer Byrne - The University of Sydney". sydney.edu.au. Retrieved 13 August 2019.
  11. ^ Byrne, Jennifer (6 February 2019). "We need to talk about systematic fraud". Nature. 566: 9–9. doi:10.1038/d41586-019-00439-9.
  12. ^ Sum, Eleanor Y. M.; Peng, Benjamin; Yu, Xin; Chen, Junjie; Byrne, Jennifer; Lindeman, Geoffrey J.; Visvader, Jane E. (18 December 2001). "The LIM Domain Protein LMO4 Interacts with the Cofactor CtIP and the Tumor Suppressor BRCA1 and Inhibits BRCA1 Activity". Journal of Biological Chemistry. 277 (10): 7849–7856. doi:10.1074/jbc.m110603200. ISSN 0021-9258.
  13. ^ Chinnaiyan, Arul M.; Sellers, William R.; Collins, Colin; Pienta, Kenneth J.; Byrne, Jennifier A.; Hsi, Bae-Li; Fletcher, Jonathan A.; Kuefer, Rainer; Storz-Schweizer, Martina (1 June 2004). "Overexpression, Amplification, and Androgen Regulation of TPD52 in Prostate Cancer". Cancer Research. 64 (11): 3814–3822. doi:10.1158/0008-5472.CAN-03-3881. ISSN 0008-5472. PMID 15172988.
  14. ^ "The Cancer Researcher Catching Scientific Fraud at Rapid Speed". www.yahoo.com. Retrieved 13 August 2019.
  15. ^ "Geneticist earns top journal praise".
  16. ^ [• https://retractionwatch.com/2017/01/19/turned-cancer-researcher-literature-watchdog/ "Cancer researcher turned literature watchdog"] Check |url= value (help). horizontal tab character in |url= at position 2 (help)
  17. ^ "Speakers | Sydney Cancer Conference 2018". scc2018.com.au. Retrieved 13 August 2019.
  18. ^ Aubusson, Kate (19 December 2017). "Sydney cancer scientist Jennifer Byrne named as one of 10 people who matter in science by Nature". The Sydney Morning Herald. Retrieved 13 August 2019.
  19. ^ "Aussie geneticist earns top journal praise". SBS News. Retrieved 13 August 2019.
  20. ^ "Nature's 10". www.nature.com. Retrieved 13 August 2019.
  21. ^ Phillips, Nicky (23 November 2017). "Online software spots genetic errors in cancer papers". Nature News. 551 (7681): 422. doi:10.1038/nature.2017.23003.
  22. ^ "And the winners are…". www.thekidscancerproject.org.au. Retrieved 13 August 2019.
https://orcid.org/0000-0002-8923-0587


DEFAULTSORT:Byrne, Jennifer Living people Year of birth missing (living people) Australian women scientists Australian women academics

Category:Australian women scientists Category:Australian academics