Dragon's Fury (roller coaster)

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Dragon's Fury
Dragon's Fury2.JPG
Chessington World of Adventures
Park section Land of the Dragons
Coordinates 51°20′53″N 0°19′09″W / 51.347988°N 0.319043°W / 51.347988; -0.319043Coordinates: 51°20′53″N 0°19′09″W / 51.347988°N 0.319043°W / 51.347988; -0.319043
Status Operating
Opening date March 27, 2004 (2004-03-27)
General statistics
Type Steel – Spinning
Manufacturer Maurer Söhne
Model Xtended SC 3000
Lift/launch system Chain lift
Height 50.8 ft (15.5 m)
Length 1,706 ft (520 m)
Inversions 0
Capacity 950 riders per hour
Height restriction 48 in (122 cm)
Trains 8 trains with a single car. Riders are arranged 2 across in 2 rows for a total of 4 riders per train.
Restraints Individual lap bar
Fastrack available
Dragon's Fury at RCDB
Pictures of Dragon's Fury at RCDB

Dragon's Fury is a spinning roller coaster opened in 2004 at Chessington World of Adventures Resort in southwest London, England. This ride has four-person cars that can be weighted evenly or with bias to one side, depending on the amount of spin desired. The general theme is "surviving the dragon's wrath".[1]

History[edit]

Dragon's Fury was announced at the beginning of the 2003 season to be the main attraction of the Land of the Dragons in Chessington World of Adventures Resort, which was to also open in 2004. The ride was purchased by the Tussauds Group alongside Spinball Whizzer, which was to open at Alton Towers for the 2004 season. Its custom layout was created by John Wardley to fit in with the terrain and area at the park. The steel spinning roller coaster ride opened in 2004.[2] It was manufactured by Maurer Söhne.[3]

2015

In early 2015, large portions of the ride's track were dismantled in order to be filled with sand. This was to reduce noise for both park guests and nearby residents. Other sections, including its lift hills were altered to reduce noise after complaints from guests riding the Tiny Truckers attraction.

In June 2015, following an incident on The Smiler, Dragon's Fury, along with Rattlesnake and Saw- The Ride at Thorpe Park were temporarily closed down whilst safety protocols and procedures were being evaluated.[4] They eventually re-opened shortly afterwards.

Description[edit]

Entrance of the ride
Themes

Most of the ride is located in the Land of the Dragons area of the park, however the entrance is located just outside. The general theme is "surviving the dragon's wrath", which is suggested by announcements made in the queue and on-ride. Theming is fairly limited, and includes 'charred' trees, a sculpted dragon head and a mechanical dragon that hides inside a small cave at the entrance of the queue line, relocated from the park's Mystic East area. The track is turquoise with ruby-red supports. When the ride opened it was sponsored by Skips, but it is now no longer, despite the fact that the logo is seen on the 'charred trees' in the queue.[citation needed]

Tracks

The ride travels mainly around the perimeter of Land of the Dragons and is best known for its horseshoe (vertical) turn, and the ride has four-person cars that can be weighted evenly or with bias to one side, depending on the amount of spin desired.[3][not in citation given] On-ride photos are available and taken at the foot of the first drop. As the car reaches the vertical turn it starts to spin. This is one of the most popular rides in the park, and queues often reach times of over an hour; even to an hour and a half.[citation needed] This is because at most 28 people can ride at once. The track of this ride can be seen throughout the park, as it reaches heights of 59 ft (18 m) in places, and can also be seen at points outside the park.

Gallery[edit]

See also[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ "Land of the Dragons". Chessington World of Adventures. Retrieved 2013-10-15.
  2. ^ "Dragon's Fury Review". T-Park. Archived from the original on 2013-10-18. Retrieved 2013-10-15.
  3. ^ a b "Dragon's Fury". RCDB. Retrieved 2013-10-15.
  4. ^ "Four rollercoasters closed following Alton Towers' Smiler crash". Mail Online. Retrieved 2017-03-19.

External links[edit]