Dragon Quest: The Adventure of Dai

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Dragon Quest:
The Adventure of Dai
DragonquestTheAdventureOfDai vol1 Cover.jpg
Cover from the first volume of the manga series Dragon Quest: The Adventure of Dai, published by Shueisha
DRAGON QUEST ダイの大冒険
(Doragon Kuesuto: Dai no Daibōken)
GenreAdventure,[1] fantasy[2]
Manga
Written byRiku Sanjo
Illustrated byKoji Inada
Published byShueisha
ImprintJump Comics
MagazineWeekly Shōnen Jump
DemographicShōnen
Original runOctober 23, 1989December 9, 1996
Volumes37 (List of volumes)
Anime television series
Directed byNobutaka Nishizawa
Produced by
  • Hiroshi Inoue
  • Yoshio Takami
Written byJunki Takegami
Music byKoichi Sugiyama
StudioToei Animation
Original networkTBS
Original run October 17, 1991 September 24, 1992
Episodes46 (List of episodes)
Anime film series
Directed by
  • Nobutaka Nishizawa (#1, #3)
  • Hiroki Shibata (#2)
Produced by
  • Rikizou Kayano
  • Tomonori Imada
Written byJunki Takegami
Music byKoichi Sugiyama
StudioToei Animation
Released July 20, 1991 July 11, 1992
Runtime31 – 40 minutes (each)
Films3 (List of films)
Manga
Yūsha Avan to Gokuen no Maō
Written byYūsaku Shibata
Published byShueisha
ImprintJump Comics
MagazineV Jump
DemographicShōnen
Original runSeptember 19, 2020 – present
Manga
Cross Blade
Written byYoshikazu Amami
Published byShueisha
ImprintJump Comics
MagazineSaikyō Jump
DemographicShōnen
Original runOctober 1, 2020 – present
Anime television series
Directed byKazuya Karasawa
Written byKatsuhiko Chiba
Music byYuki Hayashi
StudioToei Animation
Licensed by
Original networkTV Tokyo, TVO, TVA, TSC, TVh, TVQ
Original run October 3, 2020 – present
Episodes28 (List of episodes)
Wikipe-tan face.svg Anime and manga portal

Dragon Quest: The Adventure of Dai (Japanese: DRAGON QUEST ダイの大冒険, Hepburn: Doragon Kuesuto: Dai no Daibōken, lit. "Dragon Quest: The Great Adventure of Dai") is a Japanese manga series written by Riku Sanjo and illustrated by Koji Inada, based on the popular video game franchise Dragon Quest. It was serialized in Shueisha's Weekly Shōnen Jump from October 1989 to December 1996, with its chapters collected in 37 tankōbon volumes. A prequel manga series began in V Jump in September 2020 and a spin-off manga began in Saikyō Jump in October 2020.

The manga was adapted into an anime series, produced by Toei Animation and broadcast on TBS from July 1991 to July 1992. It is the second anime adaptation based on the Dragon Quest franchise after Dragon Quest: Legend of the Hero Abel. A second anime adaptation premiered on TV Tokyo in October 2020.

Dragon Quest: The Adventure of Dai is one of the Weekly Shōnen Jump's best-selling manga series of all time, with 50 million tankōbon volumes copies sold.

Plot[edit]

The story begins with a young boy named Dai remembering a story told to him by his adoptive grandfather, the monster magician Brass, about the defeat of the Demon King Hadlar by the hands of a hero known as Avan. After the defeat of the Demon King Hadlar, all of the monsters were released from his evil will and peace reigned supreme around the world once again for ten years. Some monsters and demons moved to the island of Dermline to live in peace. Dai, the young protagonist of the series, is an orphan and the only human living on the island. Having been raised by Brass and with his best friend, the monster Gome, Dai grows up dreaming of becoming a hero.

After befriending Leona, the princess of the Kingdom of Papnica and saving her from peril, Avan comes to the island accompanied by his apprentice, the magician Popp, to become Dai's teacher by her request. However, his training is interrupted by the return of Hadlar, who was resurrected by the Great Demon King Vearn and became the commander of his vast army. Avan sacrifices himself to protect his disciples and Hadlar is temporarily driven away by Dai after he awakens a mysterious power within himself.

To honor Avan's final request, Dai, Popp and Gome leave the island and begin their quest to defeat Hadlar and his master to bring peace back to the world. During their travels, Dai's party gains three other members; the healer Maam, who later becomes also a martial artist, Hyunckel, one of Hadlar's former subordinates and Leona herself.

Media[edit]

Manga[edit]

Dragon Quest: The Adventure of Dai is written by Riku Sanjo and illustrated by Koji Inada. A short story Derupa! Iruiru! (デルパ!イルイル!) was first released in the 25th and 26th issues of Weekly Shōnen Jump in 1989.[3][4] Issues 35–37 included the short story Dai Bakuhatsu!! (ダイ爆発!!!).[5][6][7] The serialization of The Adventure of Dai began that same year in the 45th issue of Weekly Shōnen Jump, published on October 23.[8] It continued on for seven years before ending in the 52nd issue of Weekly Shōnen Jump on December 9, 1996.[9] The manga was collected into 37 tankōbon volumes published between March 9, 1990 and June 4, 1997.[10][11] It was later released in 22 bunkobon volumes published from June 18, 2003 to March 18, 2004.[12][13] A 25-volume edition that includes the color pages from its original magazine run and newly drawn covers by Inada will be published between October 2, 2020 and July 2, 2021.[14]

A prequel manga series illustrated by Yūsaku Shibata, with Sanjo credited for original work, began serializing in Shueisha's V Jump manga magazine in the November issue on September 19, 2020.[15][16] The series is centered around Avan before he met Dai and his companions.

A spin-off manga written and illustrated by Yoshikazu Amami, titled Dragon Quest: The Adventure of Dai - Cross Blade, launched in the November issue of Shueisha's Saikyō Jump manga magazine on October 1, 2020.[15]

Anime[edit]

First series (1991)[edit]

Produced by Toei Animation, the anime adaptation of Dragon Quest: The Adventure of Dai aired for 46 episodes on TBS from October 17, 1991 to September 24, 1992. Despite no official Japanese DVD release, the show reran in 2007 on Toei's channel with a new master.[17] The series uses two pieces of theme music, both composed by Koichi Sugiyama and performed by Jirou Dan. "Hurry, Heroes!!" (勇者よ急げ!!, Yūsha yo Isoge!!) is used for the opening theme, while "This Road is My Journey" (この道わが旅, Kono Michi Waga Tabi), which was the original ending theme for Dragon Quest II, is used for the episodes' ending theme.[18] The series adapts the events of the first 10 volumes of the manga, with initial plans to continue onward until scheduling and time slot changes at TBS lead to the series ending after 46 episodes. To accommodate the abrupt ending, Sanjo helped to provide an adjusted finale to the anime. [19]

On January 6, 2020, the whole series was released in Japan for distribution on several video on demand (VOD) services, the first time the series has become officially available after the VHS release of the 1990s. In March 2020 it was announced that the 1991 anime will be getting a Blu-ray Box for the first time, released on July 3, 2020. The set contained all 46 episodes, and the 3 Jump Festa short anime films, (including the first film never before released on home video) which have been scanned from their original 35 mm negatives with high resolution and recorded as high-quality full HD remastered images.[20][21]

Second series (2020)[edit]

It was announced during Jump Festa 2020 that there would be a new anime adaptation that would premiere in fall 2020. The anime is produced by Toei Animation and is a hybrid of 2D and CG animation.[22] The series premiered on TV Tokyo and other affiliates on October 3, 2020. The band Macaroni Enpitsu performed the series' opening theme song "Ikiru o Suru" and the series' ending theme song "mother".[23][24] XIIX will perform the series' second ending theme song "Akashi".[25] Muse Communication licensed the second series in Southeast Asia.[26] Toei simulcasts the series with English subtitles in North America, Latin America, New Zealand, Africa, the Middle East and Europe via Crunchyroll, as well as Hulu in the United States and Anime Digital Network in France.

Films[edit]

Three theatrical movies were produced based on the first TV series, all of which premiered at the Toei Anime Fair film festival.

No.TitleOriginal air date
1"The Great Adventure of Dai"
Transcription: "Gurēto Adobenchā" (Japanese: グレート アドベンチャー)
July 20, 1991 (1991-07-20)[27]
2"Avan's Discilpes"
Transcription: "Aban no Shito" (Japanese: アバンの使徒)
March 7, 1992 (1992-03-07)[28]
3"Six Great Generals"
Transcription: "Shinsei Roku Daishōgun" (Japanese: 新生6大将軍)
July 11, 1992 (1992-07-11)[29]

Video games[edit]

During Jump Festa '20, a video game based on the series has been announced.[30]

Dragon Quest: The Adventure of Dai - Xross Blade, an arcade game with collectible trading cards was released in Japanese arcades on October 22, 2020.[31]

Dragon Quest: The Adventure of Dai - A Hero's Bonds, a smartphone RPG for iOS/Android is in development, and will release in Japan in 2021.[32]

Dragon Quest: The Adventure of Dai - Infinity Strash, an action RPG for an unannounced console, and a 2021 release.[33]

Dai appears as a playable character in the 2019 video game Jump Force, marking the first appearance of a Dragon Quest character in a Weekly Shōnen Jump crossover game.[34]

Reception[edit]

Dragon Quest: The Adventure of Dai is one of Weekly Shōnen Jump's best-selling manga series of all time,[35] with 50 million tankōbon volumes copies sold.[36] The series also had a total estimated circulation of approximately 2 billion copies in Weekly Shōnen Jump magazine between 1989 and 1996.[a] On TV Asahi's Manga Sōsenkyo 2021 poll, in which 150.000 people voted for their top 100 manga series, Dragon Quest: The Adventure of Dai ranked 30th.[37]

Notes[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ "Fly". Toei Animation Europe. Archived from the original on June 14, 2011. Retrieved January 20, 2019.
  2. ^ ドラゴンクエスト・ダイの大冒険. Akiba Souken (in Japanese). Retrieved January 20, 2019.
  3. ^ 週刊少年ジャンプ 1989/06/05 表示号数25. Media Arts Database (in Japanese). Agency for Cultural Affairs. Retrieved January 2, 2020.
  4. ^ "週刊少年ジャンプ 1989/06/12 表示号数26". Media Arts Database (in Japanese). Agency for Cultural Affairs. Retrieved January 2, 2020.
  5. ^ 週刊少年ジャンプ 1989/08/14 表示号数35. Media Arts Database (in Japanese). Agency for Cultural Affairs. Retrieved January 2, 2020.
  6. ^ 週刊少年ジャンプ 1989/08/21 表示号数36. Media Arts Database (in Japanese). Agency for Cultural Affairs. Retrieved January 2, 2020.
  7. ^ 週刊少年ジャンプ 1989/08/28 表示号数37. Media Arts Database (in Japanese). Agency for Cultural Affairs. Retrieved January 2, 2020.
  8. ^ 週刊少年ジャンプ 1989/10/23 表示号数45. Media Arts Database (in Japanese). Agency for Cultural Affairs. Retrieved January 2, 2020.
  9. ^ 週刊少年ジャンプ 1996/12/9 表示号数52. Media Arts Database (in Japanese). Agency for Cultural Affairs. Retrieved January 2, 2020.
  10. ^ DRAGON QUEST—ダイの大冒険— 1 (in Japanese). Shueisha. Archived from the original on September 24, 2005. Retrieved December 21, 2019.
  11. ^ DRAGON QUEST—ダイの大冒険— 37 (in Japanese). Shueisha. Archived from the original on August 28, 2004. Retrieved December 21, 2019.
  12. ^ DRAGON QUEST—ダイの大冒険— 文庫判 1 (in Japanese). Shueisha. Archived from the original on December 2, 2008. Retrieved January 2, 2020.
  13. ^ DRAGON QUEST—ダイの大冒険— 文庫判 22 (in Japanese). Shueisha. Archived from the original on December 2, 2008. Retrieved January 2, 2020.
  14. ^ ついに!!『ドラゴンクエスト ダイの大冒険』新装彩録版 1~3巻が10月2日(金)に発売!! 2、3巻のカバーイラストも初公開!! (in Japanese). Weekly Shōnen Jump. Retrieved January 16, 2021.
  15. ^ a b Hodgkins, Crystalyn (September 12, 2020). "Dragon Quest: Adventure of Dai Cross Blade Manga Launches on October 1". Anime News Network. Retrieved September 13, 2020.
  16. ^ Sherman, Jennifer (May 29, 2020). "Dragon Quest: The Adventure of Dai Manga Gets Prequel Manga". Anime News Network. Retrieved May 29, 2020.
  17. ^ ドラゴンクエスト ダイの大冒険(ニューマスター版)/東映チャンネル, archived from the original on 2007-10-20, retrieved 2016-06-11
  18. ^ 三条陸; 稲田浩司 (1995). 集英社 (ed.). Jump Comics Perfect Book 1 The Adventure of Dai (in Japanese). Tokyo: 集英社. pp. 100, 108. ISBN 9784088588810.
  19. ^ JUMP COMICS PERFECT BOOK 1 ダイの大冒険 Page 103
  20. ^ アニメ『ダイの大冒険』(1991)全46話の配信が開始. Famitsu (in Japanese). January 6, 2020. Retrieved March 22, 2020.
  21. ^ Komatsu, Mikikazu (March 13, 2020). "Dragon Quest: The Adventure of Dai Original TV Anime Gets Its First Blu-ray Box". Crunchyroll. Retrieved March 22, 2020.
  22. ^ "Dragon Quest: Dai no Daibōken Manga Gets New Anime Adaptation in Fall 2020 (Updated)". Anime News Network. December 20, 2019. Retrieved December 20, 2019.
  23. ^ "New Dragon Quest: Dai no Daibōken Anime Unveils Cast, October TV Premiere". Anime News Network. May 27, 2020.
  24. ^ "New Dragon Quest: Adventure of Dai Anime's Video Reveals Opening Song, October 3 Debut". Anime News Network. September 6, 2020. Retrieved September 6, 2020.
  25. ^ "XIIX Perform New Ending Theme for Dragon Quest: Adventure of Dai Anime". Anime News Network. March 19, 2021. Retrieved March 19, 2021.
  26. ^ Pineda, Rafael Antonio (September 21, 2020). "Muse Asia Licenses Burn the Witch, Love Live! Nijigasaki Anime". Anime News Network. Retrieved September 21, 2020.
  27. ^ "THE GREAT ADVENTURE OF DAI 1". Toei Animation. Archived from the original on November 29, 2013. Retrieved January 2, 2020.
  28. ^ "THE GREAT ADVENTURE OF DAI 2 Avan's Discilpes". Toei Animation. Archived from the original on November 29, 2013. Retrieved January 2, 2020.
  29. ^ "THE GREAT ADVENTURE OF DAI 3 Six Great Generals". Toei Animation. Archived from the original on November 29, 2013. Retrieved January 2, 2020.
  30. ^ Hodgkins, Crystalyn (December 20, 2019). "Dragon Quest: Dai no Daibōken Manga Also Gets Game Adaptation". Anime News Network. Retrieved December 21, 2019.
  31. ^ Romano, Sal (May 27, 2020). "Dragon Quest: The Adventure of Dai – Xross Blade announced for arcade". Gematsu. Retrieved October 2, 2020.
  32. ^ Romano, Sal (May 27, 2020). "Dragon Quest: The Adventure of Dai – Tamashii no Kizuna announced for iOS, Android". Gematsu. Retrieved October 2, 2020.
  33. ^ "Dragon Quest: Dai no Daibouken: Video Games for 2020 and 2021 Revealed!". [Dengeki Online]. May 27, 2020. Retrieved May 27, 2020.
  34. ^ Sherman, Jennifer (25 January 2019). "Dragon Quest Manga's Dai Joins Jump Force Game Lineup". Anime News Network. Retrieved 25 January 2019.
  35. ^ "Top Manga Properties in 2008 - Rankings and Circulation Data". Comipress. 2008-12-31. Retrieved 2013-08-18.
  36. ^ 漫画の登場人物の顔の分析 (PDF) (in Japanese). Yamagata University. February 2011. pp. 121–122. Retrieved 2013-11-29.
  37. ^ テレビ朝日『国民15万人がガチで投票!漫画総選挙』ランキング結果まとめ! 栄えある1位に輝く漫画は!?. animate Times (in Japanese). Animate. January 3, 2021. Archived from the original on January 3, 2021. Retrieved January 3, 2021.

External links[edit]