Dreams (The Cranberries song)

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"Dreams"
Dreams by The Cranberries 1994 UK European CD rerelease.jpg
Artwork for 1994 European rerelease (UK CD1 single pictured)
Single by the Cranberries
from the album Everybody Else Is Doing It, So Why Can't We?
B-side
  • "What You Were"
  • "Liar"
Released5 October 1992
29 September 1993
12 April 1994 (reissue)
Recorded1992
GenreAlternative rock, dream pop
Length4:32 (album version)
4:15 (UK radio edit)
4:02 (US radio edit)
LabelIsland
Songwriter(s)Dolores O'Riordan, Noel Hogan
Producer(s)Stephen Street
The Cranberries singles chronology
"Dreams"
(1992)
"Linger"
(1993)
Audio sample
Music video
"Dreams" on YouTube
Alternative cover
USA CD single (1994)
USA CD single (1994)

"Dreams" is the debut single by Irish rock band the Cranberries. It was released in 1992 and later appeared on the debut album Everybody Else Is Doing It, So Why Can't We?. It reached the top 40 on the US Hot 100 Airplay[1] and the top 30 of the UK Singles Chart in early 1994.[2] A 1990 demo version was released in Ireland only in the summer of that year under their initial band name, the Cranberry Saw Us.

The backing vocals on the song are sung by Mike Mahoney, ex-boyfriend of Cranberries lead singer Dolores O'Riordan.[3]

In 2017, the song was released as an acoustic, stripped down version on the band's Something Else album.[4]

Background[edit]

According to lead singer Dolores O'Riordan, "Dreams" was written for an early love; she explained, "I wrote that about my first love when I was living in Ireland ... It's about feeling really in love for the first time".[5] The song was later released on a demo tape with "Linger" that helped generate excitement for the band.[6]

In an interview for New Musical Express, guitarist Noel Hogan said of the song:

It's only really since Dolores passed away that I've grown a proper appreciation for songs like 'Linger' and 'Dreams'. They were just songs in the set list for us; everybody else was losing their mind about them. And when I listen to them now I realise how great they are for someone so young, which I never, ever appreciated until a year ago. We must have played it a gazillion times in our lives and it just becomes a part of the set, but it’s different now. We’re so lucky to have left that behind, to have that legacy.[7]

Music videos[edit]

There are three versions of the video. The first version of the music video features Dolores O'Riordan donning her original hairstyle that is seen on the Everybody Else Is Doing It, So Why Can't We? album cover. The video revolves around O'Riordan with the other band members flashing up throughout the video while she's sitting on in a chair with a cross as a back or a close up of her face and eyes. The video shows a mirrored image of O'Riordan to show she does the background vocals and towards the end the band members fade in and out constantly in front of O'Riordan.

The second version shows the Cranberries performing the song in a dimly lit aquatic-themed room interspersed with shots of geometric flowers hitting water. This video received high rotation on MTV's 120 Minutes in 1993 before the release of the band's next single, "Linger", and the re-release of "Dreams" worldwide.

The third version, directed by Nico Soultanakis which was most commonly shown in America, shows the Cranberries performing the song in a nightclub. Afterward, Dolores O'Riordan heads out to a house where grave robbers dressed in black have placed a very large tree pile inside. Dolores bathes the tree pile in water and a man is revealed to be buried in the pile. The water frees him and in the final seconds of the video, the man awakens.

Track listings[edit]

UK and European 12" single/CD single (1992)

  1. "Dreams" (radio edit) – 4:15
  2. "What You Were" (previously unreleased) – 3:41
  3. "Liar" (previously unreleased) – 2:22
"What You Were" is written by Dolores O'Riordan. "Liar" is written by Dolores O'Riordan and Noel Hogan. "Liar" was later featured in the 1995 film Empire Records.

UK and European 7" single

  1. "Dreams" (album version) – 4:32
  2. "What You Were" (previously unreleased) – 3:41

UK and European special edition 2-disc CD single (1994)

CD 1
  1. "Dreams" (radio edit) – 4:15
  2. "What You Were" (previously unreleased) – 3:41
  3. "Liar" (previously unreleased) – 2:22
CD 2
  1. "Not Sorry" (Live at The Record Plant, Hollywood) – 4:37
  2. "Wanted" (Live at The Record Plant, Hollywood) – 2:00
  3. "Dreams" (Live at The Record Plant, Hollywood) – 4:10
  4. "Liar" (Live at The Record Plant, Hollywood) – 3:17

US CD single

  1. "Dreams" (album version) – 4:32
  2. "What You Were" (previously unreleased) – 3:41
  3. "Waltzing Back" (Live at The Record Plant, Hollywood) – 4:02
  4. "Pretty" (Live at The Record Plant, Hollywood) – 2:09

2-track CD single[8]

  1. "Dreams" (album version) – 4:32
  2. "Linger" (album version) – 4:34

Charts[edit]

Chart (1993–94) Peak
position
Australia (ARIA)[9] 30
Canada Top Singles (RPM)[10] 27
Canada Adult Contemporary (RPM)[11] 25
Ireland (IRMA)[12] 9
Scotland (OCC)[13] 31
UK Singles (OCC)[2] 27
US Billboard Hot 100[1] 42
US Alternative Airplay (Billboard)[14] 15
US Mainstream Top 40 (Billboard)[15] 33
Chart (2018) Peak
position
Ireland (IRMA)[12] 24
Italy (FIMI)[16] 59
Poland (Polish Airplay Top 100)[17] 75
Switzerland (Schweizer Hitparade)[18] 77
US Digital Song Sales (Billboard)[19] 16
US Hot Rock & Alternative Songs (Billboard)[20] 7

Dario G version[edit]

"Dream to Me"
Dario G - Dream to Me single.jpg
Single by Dario G
from the album In Full Colour
Released22 January 2001
GenreTrance
Length3:09
Songwriter(s)
Producer(s)
  • Scott Rosser
  • Paul Spencer
Dario G singles chronology
"Voices"
(2000)
"Dream to Me"
(2001)
"Say What's on Your Mind"
(2001)

English electronic music trio Dario G, whose lead singer is Ingrid Straumstøyl, covered the song as "Dream to Me".[21] It was released in January 2001 as the lead single from their second album, In Full Colour. This version reached number one in Romania and the top 10 in Austria, Germany, and the United Kingdom.

Track listings[edit]

CD maxi-single (Europe 2001)

  1. "Dream to Me" (Radio Edit) – 3:09
  2. "Dream to Me" (Airscape Remix) – 8:58
  3. "Dream to Me" (Warrior Mix) – 7:48
  4. "Dream to Me" (Ian Wilkie Mix) – 8:05

Charts[edit]

Weekly charts[edit]

Chart (2001) Peak
position
Australia (ARIA)[22] 96
Austria (Ö3 Austria Top 40)[23] 8
Belgium (Ultratop 50 Flanders)[24] 38
Europe (Eurochart Hot 100)[25] 38
Germany (Official German Charts)[26] 9
Ireland (IRMA)[27] 16
Ireland Dance (IRMA)[28] 5
Netherlands (Dutch Top 40)[29] 33
Netherlands (Single Top 100)[30] 50
Norway (VG-lista)[31] 13
Romania (Romanian Top 100)[32] 1
Scotland (OCC)[33] 4
Spain (PROMUSICAE)[34] 18
Switzerland (Schweizer Hitparade)[35] 15
UK Singles (OCC)[36] 9
UK Dance (OCC)[37] 6

Year-end charts[edit]

Chart (2001) Position
Austria (Ö3 Austria Top 40)[38] 64
Germany (Official German Charts)[39] 55
Romania (Romanian Top 100)[32] 7
Switzerland (Schweizer Hitparade)[40] 88
UK Singles (Official Charts Company)[41] 170

Other covers[edit]

In popular culture[edit]

Movies
Television series

See also[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b "The Cranberries Chart History (Hot 100)". Billboard.
  2. ^ a b "Official Singles Chart Top 100". Official Charts Company.
  3. ^ Unterberger, Andrew (15 January 2018). "The Cranberries' 'Dreams': 10 Reasons Why It's One of the Greatest Songs of All Time". Billboard. Archived from the original on 13 October 2019. Retrieved 17 August 2020.
  4. ^ Yoo, Noah (14 March 2017). "The Cranberries Announce New Acoustic Album Something Else, Share "Linger": Listen". Pitchfork. Retrieved 23 March 2017.
  5. ^ Devaney, Ruth (10 February 2019). "The Story Behind The Song "Dreams" by the Cranberries". Off the Ball. Archived from the original on 22 June 2019. Retrieved 22 June 2019.
  6. ^ Bray, Elisa (30 April 2019). "The Cranberries on losing Dolores O'Riordan: 'She was in a good place – it made it harder to get that call'". The Independent. Retrieved 22 June 2019.
  7. ^ Aubrey, Elizabeth (22 January 2019). "The Cranberries on their final album: "It's like a little gift Dolores left behind"". NME. Retrieved 22 June 2019.
  8. ^ Amazon, Dreams/Linger (Single, Import), October 1994. Universal/Polygram.
  9. ^ "Australian-charts.com – The Cranberries – Dreams". ARIA Top 50 Singles.
  10. ^ "Top RPM Singles: Issue 2463." RPM. Library and Archives Canada.
  11. ^ "Top RPM Adult Contemporary: Issue 2471." RPM. Library and Archives Canada.
  12. ^ a b "The Irish Charts – Search Results – Dreams". Irish Singles Chart.
  13. ^ "Official Scottish Singles Sales Chart Top 100". Official Charts Company.
  14. ^ "The Cranberries Chart History (Alternative Airplay)". Billboard.
  15. ^ "The Cranberries Chart History (Pop Songs)". Billboard.
  16. ^ "Italiancharts.com – The Cranberries – Dreams". Top Digital Download.
  17. ^ "Listy bestsellerów, wyróżnienia :: Związek Producentów Audio-Video". Polish Airplay Top 100. Retrieved 5 March 2018.
  18. ^ "Swisscharts.com – The Cranberries – Dreams". Swiss Singles Chart.
  19. ^ "The Cranberries Chart History (Digital Song Sales)". Billboard. Retrieved 24 January 2018.
  20. ^ "The Cranberries Chart History (Hot Rock & Alternative Songs)". Billboard.
  21. ^ Betts, Graham (2004). Complete Uk Hit Singles. Collins. p. 195. ISBN 978-0-00-717931-2.
  22. ^ Ryan, Gavin (2011). Australia's Music Charts 1988–2010. Mt. Martha, VIC, Australia: Moonlight Publishing.
  23. ^ "Austriancharts.at – Dario G – Dream to Me" (in German). Ö3 Austria Top 40. Retrieved 30 November 2018.
  24. ^ "Ultratop.be – Dario G – Dream to Me" (in Dutch). Ultratop 50. Retrieved 30 November 2018.
  25. ^ "Eurochart Hot 100 Singles" (PDF). Music & Media. Vol. 18 no. 7. 10 February 2001. p. 10. Retrieved 6 August 2020.
  26. ^ "Offiziellecharts.de – Dario G – Dream to Me". GfK Entertainment Charts. Retrieved 30 November 2018.
  27. ^ "The Irish Charts – Search Results – Dream to Me". Irish Singles Chart. Retrieved 16 January 2020.
  28. ^ "Top 10 Dance Singles, Week Ending 1 February 2001". GfK Chart-Track. Retrieved 30 May 2019.[permanent dead link]
  29. ^ "Nederlandse Top 40 – week 17, 2001" (in Dutch). Dutch Top 40 Retrieved 30 November 2018.
  30. ^ "Dutchcharts.nl – Dario G – Dream to Me" (in Dutch). Single Top 100. Retrieved 30 November 2018.
  31. ^ "Norwegiancharts.com – Dario G – Dream to Me". VG-lista. Retrieved 30 November 2018.
  32. ^ a b "Top of the Year 2001" (in Romanian). Romanian Top 100. 9 December 2002. Archived from the original on 9 December 2002. Retrieved 15 January 2018.
  33. ^ "Official Scottish Singles Sales Chart Top 100". Official Charts Company.
  34. ^ "Spanishcharts.com – Dario G – Dream to Me" Canciones Top 50. Retrieved 30 November 2018.
  35. ^ "Swisscharts.com – Dario G – Dream to Me". Swiss Singles Chart. Retrieved 30 November 2018.
  36. ^ "Official Singles Chart Top 100". Official Charts Company.
  37. ^ "Official Dance Singles Chart Top 40". Official Charts Company. Retrieved 30 November 2018.
  38. ^ "Jahreshitparade Singles 2001" (in German). Retrieved 30 November 2018.
  39. ^ "Top 100 Singles - Jahrescharts 2001" (in German). GfK Entertainment. Retrieved 30 November 2018.
  40. ^ "Swiss Year-End Charts 2001" (in German). Retrieved 30 November 2018.
  41. ^ "The Official UK Singles Chart 2001" (PDF). UKChartsPlus. Retrieved 30 November 2018.
  42. ^ "An encore for Faye Wong". China Daily. 11 December 2009. Retrieved 17 August 2020.
  43. ^ ""Dreams" (featuring The New Tarot) [Cranberries cover]". Retrieved 15 January 2018.
  44. ^ "Japanese Breakfast Covering the Cranberries Is Pretty Perfect". Noisey. 25 April 2018. Retrieved 27 April 2018.
  45. ^ "'DREAM BIGGER' EVOKES FEELINGS OF WONDER AND INSPIRATION". Inside Mazda. Mazda USA. April 2019. Retrieved 25 May 2019.
  46. ^ Boland, Rosita (19 June 2020). "Irish Women in Harmony record Cranberries song in aid of Safe Ireland". The Irish Times. Retrieved 28 July 2020.
  47. ^ "Irish Women in Harmony". MCD.ie. n.d. Retrieved 28 July 2020.
  48. ^ "'Irán Castillo lanza dueto en inglés con su hermana Mónica". TvNotas. TV Notas. August 2020. Retrieved 26 August 2020.
  49. ^ Bettinson, Gary (1 November 2014). The Sensuous Cinema of Wong Kar-wai: Film Poetics and the Aesthetic of Disturbance. Hong Kong University Press. p. 42. ISBN 978-988-8139-29-3.
  50. ^ MSCL.com.
  51. ^ "u-subtitles.fr". www.u-subtitles.fr. Archived from the original on 25 March 2012. Retrieved 15 January 2018.
  52. ^ "u-subtitles.fr". www.u-subtitles.fr. Archived from the original on 23 December 2011. Retrieved 15 January 2018.
  53. ^ "Beach Girls (TV Mini-Series 2005)". Retrieved 15 January 2018 – via www.imdb.com.

External links[edit]