Dreiertarock

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Dreiertarock
A trick-taking game of the European Tarot card game family.
Austrian-style 54-card Tarock hand.
OriginAustria
TypeTrick-taking
Players3
Skills requiredTactics, Strategy
Cards54
DeckIndustrie und Glück
PlayAnticlockwise
Card rank (highest first)Trumps: Sküs, 21-1
K Q C J 10 9 8 7
K Q C J 1 2 3 4
Playing time20 min.
Related games
Strohmandeln, Tapp Tarock, Illustrated Tarock, Point Tarock

Dreiertarock is a 3-handed card game of the Austrian Tarock family. Although less popular than it once was, it is still played in Austria, especially in Carinthia,[1] and, in 2013, it was one of five variants of Tarock game competed for in the International Piatnik Tarock Tournament (Internationales Piatnik-Tarockturnier) in Vienna.[2]

Aim[edit]

As the declarer, to score 36 points out of a total of 70 while maximising the game and bonus points. As the two defenders to prevent the declarer winning, while also seeking to earn bonus points.

Rules[edit]

The following rules are based on Mayr and Sedlaczek, except where stated:[1]

Dealing[edit]

Eight cards are dealt to each player in anticlockwise order; then 2 packets of 3 cards are placed, face down, on the table as the talon.

Bidding[edit]

Forehand announces "Einser" ("one-er") or "Weiter!" ("pass"). Rearhand can pass or raise this to a "Zweier" ("two-er"). Further bids of Dreier, Vierer and Fünfer may be announced, each raising the game value by one increment. The bids must follow in sequence without any being skipped. Moreover, a player who has been overbid must either 'pass' (Weiter) or 'hold' (ich halte). If they hold, they are offering to play the game at the same value and have priority unless they are, in turn, overbid. So a typical sequence is: Einser - Zweier - Weiter - Ich halte - Weiter. In the case of an Einser, Zweier, etc, the winner of the auction, the declarer, may go on to make use of the talon. To do this, both packets of the talon are turned over and laid face up so that all cards are visible. The declarer then picks up one of the two packets and adds it to his hand before discarding three cards of his choice. He then plays as a soloist against the other two players.

If a player feels he has a particularly strong hand, he may bid for a Solo or Solo Valat. He must do so at the first opportunity during the bidding. A Solo is an undertaking to win the game without using the talon and outranks the Einser, Zweier, etc. announcements. A Solo Valat is an undertaking to win every trick without the talon - in effect a slam.

The final phase of bidding is where various bonuses may be announced (see Scoring).

Playing[edit]

Forehand leads to the first trick. Players must follow suit (Farbzwang) or trump (Tarockzwang), but do not have to play to win each trick (i.e. there is no Stechzwang).[3]

Scoring[edit]

Card points[edit]

Card points are totalled in the normal way for Tarock games i.e. the cards won are grouped in threes. Each packet of three cards is totted up and 2 card points subtracted. The totals are added to work out the score. A player must score at least 35 points + 2 Blatt to win i.e. 35 and 2/3, which is then rounded up to 36. See scoring in Königrufen.

Game values and bonuses[edit]

The game values and bonus points are as follows:

Game values and bonuses in Dreiertarock
Contracts Points Bonus types Unannounced Announced
Einser 1 Tarock Trull 1 -
Zweier 2 Royal Trull 1 -
Dreier 3 Mondfang 1 -
Vierer 4 Pagat Ultimo 4 8
Fünfer 2 Uhu 6 12
Solo 12 Kike 8 16
Solo Valat 96 - - -

The bonuses are won as follows:

  • Tarock Trull: all 3 'honours' in one's hand at the start i.e. the Sküs, Mond (Tarock XXI) and Pagat (Tarock I)
  • Royal Trull: all four Kings in one's opening hand.
  • Mondfang: capturing the Mond (Tarock XXI) with the Sküs.
  • Pagat Ultimo: winning the last trick with the Pagat (Tarock I).
  • Uhu ("Owl"): winning the penultimate trick with Tarock II.
  • Kike: winning the antepenultimate trick with Tarock III.

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b Mayr & Sedlaczek 2008, pp. 354-359.
  2. ^ Internationales Piatnik-Tarockturnier Wien, 19. Jänner 2013 at tarockoesterreich.jimdo.com. Retrieve 30 Jun 2018.
  3. ^ Änderungen ab 2018/19 at www.tarock.tirol. Retrieved 30 Jun 2018.

Bibliography[edit]

  • Kastner, Hugo and Gerald Kador Folkvord (2005). Die große Humboldt-Enzyklopädie der Kartenspiele. Humboldt, Baden-Baden, pp. 246-248. ISBN 978-3-89994-058-9.
  • Mayr, Wolfgang and Robert Sedlaczek (2008). Die Strategie des Tarockspiels. Atelier, Vienna. ISBN 978-3-902498-22-9.