Duško Gojković

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Duško Gojković
Dusko Goykovic Unterfahrt 2009-08-25-007.jpg
Duško Gojković in Munich, 2009
Background information
Born (1931-10-14) October 14, 1931 (age 87)
Jajce, Bosnia and Herzegovina
Genres Jazz
Occupation(s) Musician
Instruments Trumpet
Years active 1950s–present

Duško Gojković (Serbian Cyrillic: Душко Гојковић; born 14 October 1931) is a Serbian jazz trumpeter, composer, and arranger.

Biography[edit]

Gojković was born in Jajce (ex-Yugoslavia, now in Bosnia-Herzegovina).[1] He studied at the Belgrade Music Academy from 1948 to 1953. He played trumpet in dixieland bands and joined the big band of Radio Belgrade when he was eighteen. He moved to West Germany and recorded his first album as a member of the Frankfurt All Stars. He spent the next four years as a member of Kurt Edelhagen's orchestra.

In these years he played with Chet Baker, Stan Getz, and Oscar Pettiford. In 1958 he performed at Newport Jazz Festival and drew much attention on both sides of the Atlantic Ocean.

In 1966 he recorded his album Swinging Macedonia, produced by Eckart Rahn. The album contained original compositions inspired by the music of Balkans. In the years to follow he played with Miles Davis, Dizzy Gillespie, Gerry Mulligan, Sonny Rollins, Duke Jordan, and Slide Hampton.

He worked with the Kenny Clarke/Francy Boland Big Band from 1968–1973.[1]

In 1986 formed another orchestra. His next albums were Soul Connection (1994), Bebop City, Balkan Blue (1997), In My Dreams (2001), Samba do Mar (2003), and Samba Tzigane (2006). In 2004 he performed on the 200th anniversary of Serbian statehood. For the occasion he performed with an all-star big band. Two years Gojković celebrated his 75th birthday with a grand concert in Belgrade, a capitol of the Republic of Serbia.

The Brandenburg Concert – Dusko Goykovich With Strings came in 2013 showcasing Gojković performing live at Germany’s Brandenburger Theatre backed by the Brandenburg Orchestra. The same year recorded and titled to Duško Gojković & Big Bend RTS featuring Martin Gjakonovski, Latin Haze was released by PGP RTS in Serbia in 2014, while a year later it was issued in Germany on Enja with different cover and with one track missing.

Discography[2][edit]

As leader[edit]

  • 1966: Swinging Macedonia
  • 1970: As Simple as It Is (MPS)
  • 1971: After Hours (Enja)
  • 1971: It's About Blues Time
  • 1971: Ten to Two Blues
  • 1974: Slavic Mood
  • 1975: East of Montenegro
  • 1977: Wunderhorn
  • 1979: Trumpets & Rhythm Unit
  • 1983: Blues in the Gutter
  • 1983: A Day in Holland (Nilva)
  • 1983: Adio-Easy Listening Music (PGP RTB)
  • 1983: Snap Shot
  • 1987: Celebration (DIW)
  • 1992: Balkan Blue
  • 1994: Soul Connection (Enja)
  • 1995: Bebop City (Enja)
  • 1996: Balkan Connection (Enja)
  • 1999: European Dream (King)
  • 1999: Golden Earrings (King)
  • 2001: Portrait
  • 2001: In My Dreams (Enja)
  • 2002: 5 Horns and Rhythm (Enja)
  • 2003: Samba Do Mar
  • 2004: One for Klook (Sound Hills)
  • 2005: A Handful o' Soul (Enja)
  • 2006: Slavic Mood (Sony)
  • 2006: Samba Tzigane (Enja)
  • 2010: Summit Octet: 5ive Horns & Rhythm
  • 2011: Tight But Loose
  • 2013: The Brandenburg Concert
  • 2014: Latin Haze

As sideman[edit]

With Oscar Pettiford

  • Lost Tapes: Baden-Baden 1958-1959 (track 1 side 1 “But Not For Me”, G. Gershwin, recorded on July 15, 1959, Studio Recordings SWF Baden-Baden)

With the Kenny Clarke/Francy Boland Big Band

With Ekrem & Gypsy Groovz

  • Rivers of Happiness (Enja, 2005)

With Emergency

  • Emergency (CBS, 1971)

With Maynard Ferguson

  • The New Sounds of Maynard Ferguson and His Orchestra (1964)

With Woody Herman

  • Live in Antibes (1965)
  • Woody's Winners (1965)
  • Jazz Hoot (1965)
  • Woody Live East and West (1965)
  • My Kind of Broadway (1965)

With Dušan Prelević

  • U redu, pobedio sam (RTB, 1991)

With Alvin Queen

  • Ashanti (1981) (Nilva)

With Sarajevo Big Band and Sinan Alimanović

  • Najveći koncert u gradu (2000)

With YU All Stars 1977

  • 4 Lica Jazza (Jugoton, 1978)

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b Yanow, Scott. "Duško Gojković". AllMusic. Retrieved 20 November 2017.
  2. ^ "Dusko Goykovich". Discogs. Retrieved 2018-07-14.

External links[edit]